How To Make Pasta Dough

Fresh Pasta Dough

  • This dish was very delicious. I used it in a quick evening spaghetti dish, and my twin brother raved about it to the point that he is considering packing some for lunch the next day to bring to work. I just mixed the dough according to the instructions provided by “Anonymous” in their remark on how to prepare fresh pasta. Delicious! I recently purchased a pasta machine (also known as my new toy), and I want to use this recipe for handmade ravioli
  • However, this is not the proper way to produce pasta. In order to make the pasta dough, one should first make a bowl out of the flower and then put the wet ingredients in the “bowl.” After that, one should gently press down on the wet ingredients and mix until it is a doughy consistency, then knead it and add more flower as needed
  • This is an excellent tasting pasta dough. My favorite pasta dish is this one, which I’ve tried a number of times and has become a staple in my kitchen. When I create it, it turns out beautifully every time, and it works well in a variety of applications. Fetachini with a white wine sauce is a favorite of mine and my family’s as well. It does have a tendency to be a little dry, so I occasionally add roughly half of a whisked egg to it. However, other than that, it is extremely simple to prepare and is excellent for impressing guests
  • The key to success with this recipe appears, therefore, to use weight measurements rather than volume measurements for your flour and eggs – use 250g of flour (flour is supposed to be 125g/cup) and 6 oz of eggs in the shell (eggs are supposed to be 125g/cup) (2oz per large egg). This is the second time I’ve prepared the recipe this way, and it has turned out perfectly both times. However, if you volume measure packed flour, you might obtain closer to 325g of flour in two cups, and of course the dough will be unworkably dry, necessitating the addition of another egg and other ingredients as needed. Adding only the yolk of one more egg, along with a dash of water, and the completed dough ball, as well as the pasta, was PERFECT
  • I have made this three or four times now and have discovered that you must add moisture to the dough ball and pasta. My hands have been involved every time I’ve required to add water and work the dough into a ball
  • In general, I don’t like to cook. My culinary snobbery has developed as a result of my years spent living in San Francisco’s foodie culture. Because I enjoy fresh pasta, I chose this dish as well as a handful of others to test. I have a pasta machine that is not electric. I followed the recipe exactly, and the first time I made it, it turned out perfectly. Since then, I’ve made it at least 5 or 6 times. Each time, the consistency is somewhat different, and it is necessary to adjust the consistency by adding a few drops of water here and there. When I’m working with pasta, it’s quite dry. It’s not sticky in this manner, and it has a wonderful hardness to it that I enjoy. This dish comes highly recommended by me. Make it entirely by hand. Instead of committing proportions in a mixing bowl that can’t be changed, mix in with a fork and knead with your hands until you obtain the texture you desire, leaving behind the flour you don’t need. You may eliminate the variables in this manner (humidity, egg size, flour composition and dryness, etc.). It takes a bit longer, but it is far more enjoyable, impresses people, and provides significantly more control. I’m seeking for a spaghetti recipe that incorporates artichokes into the mix. Artichoke pasta was brought home from Italy by one of my daughters, and I’ve been wanting to duplicate it ever since. Anyone have any ideas on how I could do this
  • The recipe is seriously flawed. First and foremost, flour quantities should never be given in cups since the type of flour used and the way of scooping have an affect on the volume. Instead, measurements should be given in grams or ounces. I used an additional egg and a small amount of water to make sure I got the correct amount of hydration. This was something I would have expected from an amateur blogger rather than a “big” publication
  • It was incredible! The fresh pasta I made was my first ever try, and it did not disappoint. Because I had never done this before, I viewed a number of videos to obtain a better understanding of the procedure. I really enjoy the 10 minutes of kneading that I get from using my mixer. I also used a roller and cutter to make the mixer, which was a lot of fun:) It was served with shrimp in a diavolo sauce, which was delicious. This is delicious, and I really enjoy it since I can use the mixer attachments. It is an incredibly wonderful pasta, however I agree that it is a touch dry unless you add a smidgeon of water or a smidgeon of additional oil to the mix. Normally, I roll and cut thin Fettucine and boil it for 3 minutes, but this evening I’m going to attempt a baked lasagne made with sheets. We’re crossing our fingers that this spaghetti dough recipe turns out well! Is it true that I struggled with it the first time it was rolled out? No, it was not your fault. When inoodles cooked ravioli for the first time, she used an incredible low-calorie cheese filling. However, with a pinch of sea salt, it becomes quite tasty. After 2 minutes in the boiling water, I transferred them to a saucepot and cooked them for a few more minutes. Thank you very much for your help. Hubby was overjoyed to no end. As part of our low-salt diet, this dish fits in wonderfully with our lifestyle
  • I tried it out and thought it was very delicious. The fact that I could utilize it for a multitude of different styles was a huge plus. It’s easy to make and takes little time

Basic Fresh Pasta Dough Recipe

  • This dish was a complete success in my opinion. I used it in a quick evening spaghetti dish, and my twin brother raved about it to the point that he is considering packing some for lunch the next day to bring with him. Just like “Anonymous” suggested when they posted on how to make fresh pasta, I just combined the dough in the manner described by him. Delicious! Although I recently purchased a pasta machine (also known as my “new toy”), I want to use this method for handcrafted ravioli
  • Nevertheless, this is not the proper way to prepare pasta. In order to make the pasta dough, one should first make a bowl out of the flower and then put the wet ingredients in the “bowl.” After that, one should gently press down on the wet ingredients and mix until it is a doughy consistency, adding more flower if necessary
  • This is an absolutely delicious pasta dough. My favorite pasta dish is this one, which I’ve tried several times and has become my go-to. Every time I create it, it turns out beautifully, and it works well in a variety of applications. Fetachini with a white wine sauce is a favorite of mine and my family’s. The batter does seem to be a touch dry, so I occasionally add approximately half of an egg whisked together before baking it. With that caveat in mind, it is extremely simple to prepare and is excellent for impressing guests. The key to success with this recipe appears to be using weight measurements rather than volume measurements for your flour and eggs – use 250g of flour (flour is supposed to be 125g/cup) and 6 oz of eggs in the shell (eggs are supposed to be 125g/cup) (2oz per large egg). In this manner, I’ve made the recipe twice, with great results both times. However, if you volume measure packed flour, you might obtain closer to 325g of flour in two cups, and of course the dough would be unworkably dry, necessitating the addition of an additional egg and other ingredients as necessary. I discovered that adding only the yolk of one more egg was just about ideal, then a dash of water and the completed dough ball, and pasta, was PERFECT
  • I have made this three or four times now and have found that you really must add moisture. My hands have been involved every time I’ve needed to add water and work the dough into a ball
  • Generally speaking, I don’t cook. After years of living in San Francisco, I would consider myself to be a bit of a cuisine snob. This dish, as well as a couple others, appealed to me since I enjoy making fresh pasta. I use a manual pasta maker rather than an electric one. My first attempt at making it was a success since I followed the instructions exactly. This is a recipe that I’ve cooked at least 5 or 6. There is a slight variation in consistency from batch to batch, which must be adjusted with small amounts of water. I’m working with a somewhat dry pasta. It’s non-sticky and has a wonderful hardness to it, which I appreciate. This is a recipe that I would strongly suggest. By hand, of course! Instead of committing proportions in a mixing bowl that can’t be changed, stir in with a fork then knead with your hands until you reach the texture you desire, leaving behind the flour you don’t need. You may eliminate the variables this way (humidity, egg size, flour composition and dryness, etc.). Taking the long route is more time-consuming, but it is lot more enjoyable, impresses people, and offers greater control. I’m seeking for a spaghetti dish that incorporates artichokes into the mix since mess=fun for me. Artichoke pasta was brought home from Italy by one of my daughters, and I’ve been wanting to duplicate it ever since! Can somebody tell me how to make this
  • The recipe is seriously flawed. As a rule, flour quantities should never be given in cups since the kind of flour used and the way of scooping have an affect on the volume. Instead, measurements should be given in grams or ounces only. For the correct amount of hydration, I added one additional egg and a splash of water. Not what I would have expected from a “big” magazine, but what I would have expected from a novice blogger. The fresh pasta was a first-time experience for me, and it did not disappoint. Because I had never done this before, I spent a lot of time watching tutorials to acquire a handle on it. 10 minutes of kneading in my mixer is absolutely my favorite part of the process. My roller and cutter for the mixer were also utilized, which made it much more enjoyable:). A diavolo sauce was used to accompany the shrimp. The fact that I can utilize the mixer attachments makes this recipe much more appealing. If you do not add a small amount of water or a dash extra oil, the spaghetti will be too dry. However, it is an incredibly excellent pasta. Normally, I roll and cut thin Fettucine and boil it for 3 minutes, but this evening I’m going to try a baked lasagne with sheets. With our fingers crossed, this spaghetti dough recipe will be a hit with everyone! Have you noticed that I struggled with it during the initial roll-out of the program? No, that was not your fault at all! I cooked ravioli for the first time using a fantastic low-calorie cheese filling, which turned out fantastically! With a pinch of sea salt, it’s still really tasty. After 2 minutes in the boiling water, I transferred them to a saucepot and cooked them for a few minutes more. Thank you very much for your time and consideration. ‘My husband was overjoyed.’ As part of our low-salt diet, this meal fits in wonderfully with our lifestyle
  • I tried it out and thought it was delicious. The fact that I could utilize it for a variety of different styles was a big plus. The recipe is straightforward and takes little time to prepare.

Preparation

  1. Fill the middle of a big, wide mixing basin with flour and set aside. Using a fork, make a well in the center of the mound and fill it with eggs and yolks. Begin by incorporating the flour into the eggs, starting with the inside rim of the well and working your way outward. It will begin to form a shaggy mass after approximately half of the flour has been added
  2. Once the last half of the flour has been added, the dough will form a smooth mass. Continue to combine the dough with your fingertips as needed. Any stray flour fragments should be pressed into the lump of dough. If necessary, add an additional egg yolk or a tablespoon of water to ensure that all of the flour is absorbed. The dough should be scraped from the bowl after it has gathered together into a compact mass. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for another 4 to 5 minutes, or until it is smooth, elastic, and uniform in color, before transferring to the prepared baking sheet. Allow for at least 30 minutes (and maybe as long as 4 hours) at room temperature after wrapping the dough in plastic. Three baking sheets should be lined with parchment paper and lightly dusted with semolina flour before baking. Set aside a fourth of the dough and cut it into quarters. Remove the remaining from the oven and set it aside. Then, using the heel of your palm, flatten the dough into an oval that is roughly the same width as your pasta machine, or about six inches in width. Make use of the widest setting on the rollers and feed the dough through them
  3. Prepare a lightly floured cutting board or countertop and carefully press the dough together into halves, so that it is approximately the same width as the pasta machine. Feed the spaghetti through the machine once again at the widest possible setting. Consider these early rollings to be a prolonged kneading session. To finish, continue to fold and roll the dough in thirds until it is smooth, silky, and uniform in texture. Make every effort to stretch the sheet to fill the whole width of the machine. As soon as the dough has become silky and smooth, you may begin to roll it out thinner and thinner. Roll it through each of the next two or three settings once more, adding flour as required, until the dough is about 1/4-inch thick
  4. Repeat with the remaining dough. When the pasta is about 1/4-inch thick, continue rolling it through each setting twice more than once. If the pasta is adhering to itself as you roll it, lightly sprinkle all-purpose or 00 flour on both sides of the spaghetti as you roll it. When you hold the pasta sheet under a sheet, you should be able to see the shape of your hand, around 1/16-inch thick for noodles and 1/32-inch thick for a packed pasta, when you hold the pasta sheet under a sheet It is unlikely that you will get to the narrowest level on most devices.)
  5. Cut the spaghetti into sheets that are approximately 12 to 14 inches long. Lightly dust the sheets with semolina flour and stack them on one of the baking sheets that have been prepared. Cover with a clean, lightly wet dish towel to keep the sheets from drying out. Repeat the process with the remaining dough.

Homemade Pasta

Using a large, wide mixing basin, mound the flour in the center of it. A well should be dug in the center of the mound, into which should be placed the eggs and their yolks. Begin by incorporating the flour into the eggs, starting with the inside rim of the well and working your way outwards. By the time half of the flour has been mixed, the dough will begin to join together in a shaggy mass. Continue to combine the dough with your fingertips as necessary. Using your fingers, press any loose flour particles into the dough mass.

  1. The dough should be scraped from the bowl after it has gathered together into a compact mass; Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand for another 4 to 5 minutes, or until it is smooth, elastic, and uniform in color, before transferring to the baking sheet.
  2. Three baking sheets should be lined with parchment paper and lightly dusted with semolina flour before baking begins.
  3. Set aside the rest of the rest.
  4. Make sure the dough is passed through the rollers at their largest setting Distribute the dough on a lightly floured cutting board or countertop and carefully press it together into halves, so that it is about equal in width to the pasta machine.
  5. These first rollings should be viewed more like a prolonged kneading session.
  6. Make every effort to ensure that the sheet spans the whole width of the machine; and Once the dough has become silky and smooth, you may begin to roll it out more thinly to get your desired thickness.
  7. If your pasta is adhering to itself as you roll it, lightly sprinkle all-purpose or 00 flour on both sides of the spaghetti as you roll it.
  8. When you hold the pasta under a sheet, you should be able to see the shape of your hand just barely.
  9. ; Preparation: Separate the spaghetti into long strips (12 to 14 inches in length).

Lightly dust the sheets with semolina flour and stack them on one of the baking sheets that have been prepared. Cover with a clean, lightly wet dish towel to keep the sheets from sticking together. To make a second batch of dough, double the recipe.

Homemade Pasta Recipe Ingredients

Make wonderful fresh pasta at home with only four ingredients, all of which are likely to be found in your pantry or refrigerator already:

  • Pasta produced using all-purpose flour has proven me incorrect in the past. I used to believe that you required 00 flour or semolina flour to make excellent fresh pasta, but this handmade pasta recipe has shown me wrong. Regular all-purpose flour produces chewy, bouncy noodles every time it is used in this recipe. Eggs– The most important element in the dough, since they provide richness and moisture. Olive oil– A few drops of olive oil, together with the eggs, moistens the dough and aids in its cohesiveness. For the finest flavor, salt should be added to both the dough and the pasta water.
See also:  How To Store Pasta Long Term

The whole recipe, including measurements, may be seen below.

How to Make Pasta

Detailed instructions and measurements are included in the recipe section below.

Homemade Pasta Serving Suggestions

For those of you who have never tried fresh pasta before, you are in for a real treat! Its chewy, bouncy texture, as well as its rich flavor, distinguish it from the dry pasta available at the grocery store. In fact, these noodles are so delicious that we normally offer them in their most basic form. With marinara sauce, pesto, home-made Alfredo sauce, or just olive oil and vegan Parmesan or Parmesan cheese, they’re quite delicious. Of course, they’re also delectable in bigger pasta meals like rigatoni.

  • For those of you who have never tried fresh pasta before, you are in for a real treat! Compared to store-bought dry pasta, it has a chewy, bouncy texture and a rich taste that makes it far superior. We actually like to serve these noodles plain since they are so delicious. With marinara sauce, pesto, home-made Alfredo sauce, or just olive oil and vegan Parmesan or Parmesan cheese, they’re quite delicious! In addition to smaller pasta meals, they’re also wonderful in bigger ones. Any of the following dishes may be made with them rather than dry pasta:

More of my favorite pasta recipes may be found here.

Homemade Pasta

Preparation time: 30 minutes 30 minutes of resting time Serves 3 to 4 people Made from scratch, this fresh handmade pasta is incredibly tasty and simple to prepare! Make a simple dish out of it by tossing it with olive oil and Parmesan cheese, or use it into your favorite pasta dishes.

  • To construct a nest out of the flour, spread it out on a clean work area. To make the middle of the cake, place the eggs, olive oil, and salt in the center and gently break up the eggs with a fork, trying to keep the flour walls as intact as possible. To integrate the flour, gently press it into the batter with your hands. Working with your hands, bring the dough together into a shaggy ball. Knead the dough for 8 to 10 minutes until it is elastic. Although the dough will seem dry at first, persevere and the dough will come together. Initially, it may not appear as though the dough will come together, but after 8-10 minutes of kneading, the dough should become cohesive and smooth. To integrate a small amount of water if the dough is still too dry, sprinkle a small amount of water over your fingertips and work it in. If the mixture becomes too sticky, sprinkle extra flour onto your work surface. Make a ball out of the dough and cover it tightly in plastic wrap, then let it aside at room temperature for 30 minutes. Set aside 2 big baking sheets dusted with flour for later use. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into four pieces. Gently flatten one into an oval disk using your hands. Place dough in the Pasta Roller Attachment and roll it out. the first three times on level 1 (the most expansive setting)
  • Place the dough piece on a counter or work surface to be worked on. Then fold both short ends in to meet in the center, then fold the dough in half to make a rectangle (as seen in the photograph above)
  • Feed the dough through the pasta roller three times on level 2, three times on level 3, and once on each of levels 4, 5, and 6 of the pasta roller. Half of the pasta sheet should be placed on the prepared baking sheet and sprinkled with flour before folding the other half on top of the first half. More flour should be sprinkled on top of the second half. Every side of the pasta should be floured to ensure that the final spaghetti noodles do not adhere to one another. Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Feed the pasta sheets through thePasta Cutter Attachment to cut them into shapes (pictured is the fettuccine cutter). Repeat the process with the remaining dough. Cook the pasta for 1 to 2 minutes in a saucepan of salted boiling water
  • Drain.

To construct a nest out of the flour, spread it out on a clean area. Then, using a fork, carefully break up the eggs while preserving as much of the flour walls as possible, pour in the olive oil and season with salt. Bring the flour inward with your hands, gently incorporating it as you go. Continue to mix the dough with your hands until it comes together into a shaggy ball; knead the dough for approximately 8 to 10 minutes. Although the dough will feel dry at first, persevere and it will come together!

  • To integrate a small amount of water if the dough is still too dry, sprinkle some over your fingers and work it in.
  • Make a ball out of the dough and cover it tightly in plastic wrap, then set it aside for 30 minutes at room temperature.
  • Make four pieces of dough out of the dough.
  • Place dough in the Pasta Roller Attachment and roll it through.
  • Then fold both short ends in to meet in the center, then fold the dough in half to make a rectangle (as seen in the figure above).
  • Half of the pasta sheet should be placed on the prepared baking sheet and sprinkled with flour before folding the second half on top of the other half.
  • Every side of the pasta should be floured to ensure that the finished spaghetti noodles do not adhere to one another; To make a second batch of dough, double the recipe.

To make a second batch, repeat the same with the second dough ball. For 1 to 2 minutes, cook the pasta in a saucepan of salted boiling water.

Easy Homemade Pasta Dough

I made these raviolis today without using a machine; instead, I rolled them out by hand. Despite my husband’s reservations, the entire family enjoyed it! I can now make my own pasta, which is fantastic! In addition, because I was out of olive oil, I substituted normal old vegetable oil. It was fantastic! More information can be found at

Most helpful critical review

I didn’t end up using any water, and the dough was a little sticky at first, but it worked fine after being coated with flour before rolling and cutting. However, the spaghetti was a little too eggy in flavor. There are 101 reviews.

  • 5star ratings received: 92
  • 4star ratings received: 7. 2 stars for 3 stars
  • 0 stars for 2 stars
  • 0 stars for 1 star

I made these raviolis today without using a machine; instead, I rolled them out by hand. Despite my husband’s reservations, the entire family enjoyed it! I can now make my own pasta, which is fantastic! In addition, because I was out of olive oil, I substituted normal old vegetable oil. It was fantastic! More information can be found at

Making this dish for the sixth time, I decided to go out and experiment with garlic-infused oil, which really improved the flavor.

My finicky husband was a big fan of it!

Continue readingAdvertisement I followed the recipe exactly as described and used the dough to create spinach and mushroom ravioli, which turned out beautifully!

I’m going to use this for all of my handmade pasta dishes!

When I make it, it always comes out with a terrific bite, and every now and then I add turmeric to make a beautiful yellow hue.

The only thing I changed was that I used “00” flour instead of regular flour, which is what I generally do.

I set the dial to 3 and ran each section through the machine many times, folding it in on itself each time I went through it.

Thank you for the recipe, it turned out perfectly.

To flatten the dough, use the pasta attachment on a Kitchenaid mixer.

Even my finicky eaters were able to enjoy these!

The “00” flour gives it a fresher and softer flavour.

However, the pasta was a little too eggy.

Homemade Pasta

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. Please take the time to read my disclosure policy. My favorite handmade pasta recipe has only four ingredients and can be cooked by hand, in a stand mixer, or in a food processor. In addition, there are instructions on how to roll out your pasta by hand or using a pasta maker. It seems like I’ve had an uncontrollable obsession with handmade pasta recently. And, oh my god, you guys, I am in love with it to the extreme. When Barclay and I returned from our trip to the Amalfi Coast last spring, we were certain that we wanted to make more authentic Italian food from scratch in our own small kitchen at home.

  • Consequently, this spring, Barclay set his eyes on making handmade mozzarella (more on that to come), while I returned home eager to plunge into the realm of homemade pastas, gnocchi, and breads of all types (more on that to come).
  • It turns out that making handmade pasta is even more enjoyable — as well as simple, tasty, and entertaining — than I had anticipated!
  • It takes less than 5 minutes to prepare the dough if you have a food processor, which is highly recommended.
  • For those who prefer to roll out pasta by hand, I’ve provided instructions below on how to do it with a stand mixer and a rolling pin as well.) I’ve also had a lot of fun experimenting with different types of pasta flour and determining which ones I prefer for particular situations.
  • However, we’ve really just been enjoying some delicious fresh spaghetti.
  • And it has immediately raised the quality of several of our favorite pasta dishes by several notches.
  • On a Friday night, I’m inviting a group of girls over to share a bottle of rosé as we make a batch of handmade pasta together.
  • Surprise friends and neighbors with a tupperware full of adorable little fresh pasta nests as presents, or make them yourself.
  • And if you’re a lover of very fantastic pasta, I have a feeling this may become one of your new favorite things as well.
  • I’ve attempted to provide a variety of approaches and alternatives that may be used with whatever you happen to have in your kitchen.

If you want to make handmade pasta, please experiment and find the way that works best for you – and please report back if you succeed! I’d be interested in hearing how things turn out.

Homemade Pasta Recipe | 1-Minute Video

Okay, before we get into the details of the recipe, here are a few crucial points to remember about the pasta components you will need to produce 1 pound of classic handmade egg pasta:

  • Flour: I truly enjoy making my own handmade pasta with “00” flour, which produces the silkiest spaghetti possible. In contrast, if I’m cooking a sauce that needs to be a little heartier, I’ll use half “00” flour and half semolina flour, which makes the pasta a little more robust and helps the sauce adhere to the pasta a little more effectively. That being said, any of the three flours listed below (or a mix of them) will work with this recipe:
  • “00” flour: This is my personal favorite since it gives the dough an additional smooth feel
  • Semolina flour: This is a heartier flour that can help the pasta cling to the sauce more effectively. (Semolina is also my favorite flour to use as a dusting on the cutting board and pasta while you are in the process of rolling out the dough. All-purpose flour: If this is the only flour you have on hand, it will also work rather well.
  • Eggs: This recipe asks for four big eggs, which are not hard boiled. Also useful for moistening the dough is olive oil (extra virgin). (If the dough is still too dry, you may add a few tablespoons of water to moisten it more.)
  • A teaspoon of fine sea salt will be added to the recipe as well as a pinch more to the pasta water as it is being cooked.

Homemade Pasta Equipment:

I’ve provided step-by-step directions for making handmade pasta entirely by hand in the section below. Alternatively, if you happen to own a food processor (which is my preferred technique) or a stand mixer, you can save yourself some time as well. In terms of rolling out the spaghetti, you can do so by hand if you want to save time (with a rolling pin and a knife). Alternatively, you may also consider investing in a:

  • Pasta maker: I acquired the Atlas 150pasta maker, which I really adore and would highly suggest. Alternatively, if you happen to possess a KitchenAid stand mixer, its pasta roller attachment will work just as well
  • Pasta drying rack: This is optional, but it is quite useful (and attractive!). I chose this wooden pasta drying rack, which I just adore

How To Make Pasta In A Food Processor:

This is my fave method of preparing handmade pasta since it is the quickest and most straightforward! Simply place all four ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until smooth (fitted with the normal blade attachment). In a food processor, pulse for approximately 10 seconds, or until the mixture achieves a crumbly texture (see above). Remove the dough from the bowl and pat it into a ball with your hands before transferring it to a lightly floured cutting board to rest. Make sure the dough is smooth and elastic by kneading it for 1-2 minutes.

Use right away or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 day.

How To Make Pasta In A Stand Mixer:

Making handmade pasta in this manner is my favourite method, as it is the quickest and most straightforward! Add all four ingredients to the bowl of a food processor and pulse until well combined (about 30 seconds) (fitted with the normal blade attachment). 10 seconds, or until the mixture reaches a crumbly consistency, pulse the processor for a few seconds more (see above). Remove the dough from the bowl and form it into a ball with your hands before transferring it to a lightly floured cutting board to cool.

The dough may be moistened with an additional tablespoon or two of water if it appears too dry.) Simply add more flour if the dough is too moist or sticky; nonetheless, you want the dough to be rather dry.) With your hands, shape the dough into a ball and cover it securely in plastic wrap.

Refrigerate for up to 1 day if not used right away or immediately.

How To Make Pasta By Hand:

It’s not a problem if you don’t have a food processor or stand mixer. Make a pile of flour on a big chopping board and set it aside. Then, using your fingers or a spoon, make a well in the center of the flour mound that is about an inch deep (kind of like a volcano). Place the eggs in the center of the well and cover with plastic wrap. On top of the eggs, sprinkle with salt and drizzle with olive oil to finish. To begin whisking the eggs, start with a fork. As soon as they are incorporated, begin gradually whisking in part of the surrounding flour, gradually adding more and more until the egg mixture is nicely thickened (about 5 minutes).

Then, using your hands, fold the remainder of the dough into the first until everything is well incorporated.

You can add an extra tablespoon or two of water if the dough appears to be too dry; nevertheless, you want the dough to be rather dry.

Form the dough into a ball with your hands, cover it securely in plastic wrap, and allow it to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before using it as directed. Use right away or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 day.

How To Roll Fresh Pasta With A Pasta Maker:

As soon as you have finished resting the dough for 30 minutes and it is ready to use, take it from the plastic wrap and place it on a cutting board again. Use a knife to cut the dough into four equal wedges (like you’re slicing a pie), then set one wedge aside andimmediatelywrap the remaining three in the plastic wrap again to keep them from drying out. To prepare the cutting board (or big baking sheet), generously sprinkle it with flour and lay it aside. Shape the dough wedge into an oval-shaped flat disc with your hands, using your fingers.

  1. In my pasta maker, this is the first setting on the dial.) Once the sheet has been removed, fold it in thirds, much like you would fold a piece of paper to fit it into an envelope, to make it more compact.
  2. Once the dough has been sent through the rollers a few times, progressively lower the settings one at a time, until the pasta has reached the thickness you wish.
  3. If your dough sheet becomes too lengthy to handle, just cut it in half using a knife to make it manageable again.
  4. Then, put the cutter attachment to your pasta machine and begin cooking!
  5. Fill your pasta maker with your preferred form of pasta by feeding the sheet through the attachment.
  6. Repeat the process with the remainder of the pasta dough.
See also:  How To Cook Penne Pasta

How To Roll Fresh Pasta With A Stand Mixer:

The procedure for making pasta using a stand mixer is nearly identical to that for making pasta with a traditional pasta maker. (Besides the fact that it’s less difficult because you don’t have to use one hand to spin the machine!) Connect the pasta roller attachment to your stand mixer in a few simple steps. To widen the adjustment knob, turn it all the way to the left. Then, following the directions above, form and feed the pasta dough through the roller until it reaches the appropriate thinness, lightly flouring the pasta as you go to keep it from sticking to the roller.

Once you’ve finished with the roller attachment, you may connect the cutter attachment of your choosing.

Feed the dough through the cutter until it is completely cut through. To finish drying, either transfer the cut pasta to a drying rack or swirl it into little pasta “nests” and place them on a floured surface to dry for 30 minutes. Repeat the process with the remainder of the pasta dough.

How To Roll Fresh Pasta By Hand:

The procedure for making pasta using a stand mixer is very identical to that for making pasta with a conventional pasta machine. For the sake of simplicity, one hand is not required to turn the machine (it’s just simpler that way!). All that is required is that you attach the pasta roller attachment to your stand mixer. Set the adjustment knob to the widest possible setting on the adjusting knob. In order to prevent sticking, carefully flour the pasta dough as you work it into the pasta roller in the manner described above.

Repeat the process with your pasta sheet until it is ready to use.

Then, disconnect the roller attachment and connect the cutter attachment of your choosing to your machine.

To finish drying, either transfer the cut pasta to a drying rack or swirl it into little pasta “nests” and set them on a floured surface to dry for 30 minutes.

How To Cook Fresh Pasta:

Using a big stockpot of liberally salted water, bring to a rolling boil over high heat while you prepare the fresh pasta. Add in the new pasta and immediately begin to gently mix it in order to prevent the noodles from sticking together. Cook the pasta until it is al dente, maybe another minute or so. (Be sure to keep an eye on it because fresh pasta cooks more faster than dry spaghetti!) After that, drain the fresh pasta and use it right away. It is important to note that the cooking time for fresh pasta will be totally dependent on the thickness of the pasta; thus, it is important to check the pasta often to ensure that it has reached the right al dente texture.

How To Store Fresh Pasta:

Using a large stockpot of well salted water, bring to a rolling boil over high heat while prepping the fresh pasta. Add in the new spaghetti and immediately begin to gently toss it in so that the noodles do not become clumped together. Cook the pasta until it is al dente, about another minute or so after it starts to boil. (Keep an eye on it since fresh pasta cooks much more quickly than dry spaghetti! Once this is done, drain the new pasta and use it right away. In order to achieve the correct al dente texture, the cooking time for fresh pasta will be determined only by the thickness of the pasta.

I find that when I roll pasta to setting 6 on my pasta machine, it takes around 90 seconds for it to cook.

Recipes To Make With Fresh Pasta:

Using a large stockpot of liberally salted water, bring to a rolling boil over high heat while prepping the pasta. Toss in the new spaghetti and carefully toss it in so that the noodles do not become clumped together. Continue to boil the pasta until it is al dente. (Keep an eye on it since fresh pasta cooks much more quickly than dry spaghetti!) After that, drain the new pasta and use it right away. It is important to note that the cooking time for fresh pasta will be largely dependent on the thickness of the pasta; thus, it is important to check it frequently to ensure that it has reached the right al dente texture.

In my pasta machine, it takes around 90 seconds to cook pasta rolled to setting 6.

  • Cacio e Pepe (shown above)
  • Pasta Carbonara
  • Pasta Marinara
  • Pasta Arrabbiata
  • Pasta Aglio e Olio
  • Fettuccine Alfredo
  • Cacio e Pepe (shown above)
  • Cacio e Pepe (

Description

Easy to prepare by hand, in a stand mixer, or in a food processor, this 4-ingredient handmade pasta dish is a family favorite. See the suggestions above for instructions on how to roll out the pasta by hand, using an apasta maker, or with a stand mixer.

How To Make Pasta In A Food Processor:

  1. Place all of the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the standard blade attachment. Process until smooth. Pulse the mixture for about 10 seconds, or until it achieves a crumbly texture (as shown in the photographs above)
  2. Remove the dough from the bowl and shape it into a ball with your hands, then transfer the dough to a lightly floured cutting board. Make sure the dough is smooth and elastic by kneading it for 1-2 minutes. (If the dough appears to be too dry, a tablespoon or two of water can be added to it.) If the mixture appears to be too moist or sticky, simply add a little more flour
  3. Nonetheless, you want the dough to be rather dry.)
  4. Hand-form the dough into a ball and cover it securely in plastic wrap to prevent it from spreading. Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before using it. Use right away or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 day. You may either roll out the pasta dough by hand or use a pasta maker to cut it into the shape you choose (see notes above). Using a big pot of well salted boiling water, cook the pasta until it is al dente, which will take anywhere between 1 and 5 minutes depending on the thickness of your spaghetti. Drain the water and use it right away

How To Make Pasta In A Stand Mixer:

  1. All of the ingredients should be combined in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Knead the dough on a low speed for 8-10 minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic, depending on your preference. (If the dough appears to be too dry, a tablespoon or two of water can be added to it.) If the dough appears to be too moist or sticky, simply add more flour
  2. Nonetheless, you want the dough to be rather dry.)
  3. Hand-form the dough into a ball and cover it securely in plastic wrap to prevent it from spreading. Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before using it. Use right away or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 day. You may either roll out the pasta dough by hand or use a pasta maker to cut it into the shape you choose (see notes above). Using a big pot of well salted boiling water, cook the pasta until it is al dente, which will take anywhere between 1 and 5 minutes depending on the thickness of your spaghetti. Drain the water and use it right away

How To Make Pasta By Hand:

  1. Make a pile of flour on a big chopping board and set it aside. Make a well in the midst of the flour mound with your fingers or a spoon, making sure it is a fair size (kind of like a volcano). Place the eggs in the center of the well and cover with plastic wrap. Sprinkle the salt and sprinkle the olive oil on top of the eggs and whisk them together with a fork until they are well blended. Afterwards, continue to gradually whisk in part of the surrounding flour into the egg mixture, gradually increasing the amount of flour used until the egg mixture is lovely and thick. It’s okay if a few eggs accidently slip out
  2. Simply use your hands or a bench scraper to gently remove them back into the bowl. Fold in the remainder of the dough with your hands until the dough forms a loose ball of dough. Knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic, putting some more flour on the cutting board if necessary to prevent sticking or if the dough appears to be too moist or sticky at any point throughout the process. In addition, if the dough appears to be too dry, you can add an additional tablespoon or two of water
  3. Nonetheless, the dough should be reasonably dry.)
  4. Hand-form the dough into a ball and cover it securely in plastic wrap to prevent it from spreading. Allow the dough to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before using it. Use right away or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 day. You may either roll out the pasta dough by hand or use a pasta maker to cut it into the shape you choose (see notes above). Using a big pot of well salted boiling water, cook the pasta until it is al dente, which will take anywhere between 1 and 5 minutes depending on the thickness of your spaghetti. Drain the water and use it right away

Notes

Flour: As previously stated in the blog article, I make handmade pasta with “00” flour the majority of the time since it produces the silkiest pasta. In contrast, if I’m cooking a sauce that needs to be a little heartier, I’ll use half “00” flour and half semolina flour, which results in pasta that is a little more firm and also helps the sauce adhere more effectively to the pasta. Having said that, any of the three flour alternatives stated above will be satisfactory. A post published on May 15, 2019 by Ali

Homemade Pasta Dough

Preparation time: 15 minutes Plus standing time

Makes

This recipe makes 6 servings. Take a chance. Once you’ve had handmade pasta, you’ll never go back. Milwaukee resident Kathryn Conrad shared her thoughts. Photo courtesy of Taste of Home of Homemade Pasta Dough Recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup semolina flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs yolk

Directions

  1. To begin, mix together the first six ingredients in a small bowl. Prepare a mound of all-purpose and semolina flours on a clean work area by mixing them together. Create a huge well in the center of the table. Fill up the well with the egg mixture. Using a fork or your fingertips, gently incorporate the flour mixture into the egg mixture to make a soft dough (the dough will be somewhat sticky)
  2. Work surface should be lightly dusted with flour, and the dough should be kneaded 5 times. Divide the mixture into 6 parts
  3. Cover and set aside for 30 minutes. To create fettuccine, roll each ball into a 10×8-inch rectangle with a little sprinkling of flour and set aside. Roll up in a jelly-roll fashion. Cut the strips into 1/4-inch wide strips. Cook for 1-3 minutes in boiling water
  4. Remove from heat.

How-to: Learn how to create this homemade dough in this video. Check out the video.

Nutrition Facts

1 serving: 217 calories, 5 grams of fat (1 gram of saturated fat), 93 milligrams of cholesterol, 124 milligrams of sodium, 34 grams of carbohydrate (0 sugars, 1 gram of fiber), 8 grams of protein

Making Fresh Pasta Dough Is Worth Every Single Step

Pasta night calls for an unique pasta dish. Making your own dough takes a little time, but the procedure itself is not difficult. Making the dough is simple and takes only a few minutes; it only requires three basic ingredients. It is strongly advised that you use a pasta machine because rolling out the dough by hand takes a long time and is difficult to get the right thickness of the dough. Make careful to wrap any section of the dough that isn’t being worked on in plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel to prevent it from drying out.

  • A broad, long noodle such as pappardelle or fettuccine is the most frequent and best for a bolognese sauce like this.
  • The dough is made from the same basis as forraviolias.
  • Any leftover dough will keep nicely in the freezer.
  • After it has dried out, it may be kept in a freezer-safe bag for up to three months at room temperature.
  • Just add a minute or two to the cooking time to make up for it.
  • In any case, you are about to savor some of the most delicious pasta you have ever tasted.

Please share your experience with us in the comments section below! 4 to 6 servings per recipe Preparation time: 0 hours and 10 minutes Time allotted: 2 hours 30mins 2 1/4 cup all-purpose flour, with a little extra for the surface a half teaspoon of kosher salt 4 big eggs (about)

  1. In a medium-sized mixing basin, combine the flour and salt. Fill a large mixing bowl halfway with flour and set aside. Create a well in the center of the flour with your hands. Crack the eggs into a well and, using a fork, slowly mix in the flour until a shaggy dough forms
  2. Set aside. Knead the dough with your hands until it is smooth and no longer sticky, approximately 5 minutes. If required, sprinkle flour on the work surface to prevent the dough from sticking. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and place it in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Cut the dough into quarters when you’re ready to roll the pasta. Wrap everything but one in plastic wrap and set it back in the refrigerator. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface into a long rectangle that’s a bit narrower than the width of your pasta roller. Repeat with the remaining dough. Make use of the largest setting on your pasta roller and run the rolled out dough through it three times. Fold the short ends of the dough together to meet in the center of the rectangle, then fold in half so that the dough is divided into four equal pieces. Roll out the pasta dough until it is only slightly narrower than the width of the pasta roller once more, and then repeat the process. If the dough is springing back excessively, cover it with a kitchen towel and set it aside for 10 minutes to rest. 3 to 4 more times, or until the dough is extremely smooth
  3. Decrease setting by one degree and run pasta dough through once
  4. Reduce setting by one degree after each pass through until you’ve reached the desired thickness of pasta
  5. Reduce setting by one degree and run pasta dough through once more
  6. Regular pasta is around 1/16 of an inch thick, whereas filled pasta is approximately 1/32 inch thick. If you’re using a Kitchenaid attachment, we recommend stopping at setting 5. To make the pasta dough, run it through twice on the final desirable setting on the machine. If your spaghetti sheet gets too lengthy to handle, split it in half to make it more manageable. Repeat the process with the leftover dough in the refrigerator. Cover the rolled-out dough with a clean kitchen towel while it rises. 2 big baking sheets should be lightly floured. Trim the dough’s edges to create a neat rectangle, and then cut the pasta into the appropriate form. In order to make fettuccine-like pasta, we want 11″ long and 1/4″ width. Place the spaghetti on floured baking sheets and cover with a clean kitchen towel to keep the pasta from drying out. Allow for approximately 30 minutes of drying time. To prepare a meal: Prepare a big saucepan of salted water by bringing it to a boil. Cook the pasta until it is al dente, about 7 to 9 minutes. Drain the pasta and combine it with the selected sauce.

Combine the flour and salt in a medium-sized mixing basin. Fill a clean surface with the flour mixture and spread evenly. Form a well in the center of the flour with your hands. Eggs should be cracked into a well and slowly whisked into flour with a fork until a shaggy dough is formed. Hand-knead the dough for about 5 minutes, or until it is smooth and no longer sticky. To prevent the dough from adhering to the surface, sprinkle more flour on top. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour after carefully wrapping the dough in plastic wrap.

  1. Wrap everything (except one) in plastic wrap and put it back in the fridge.
  2. Make use of the largest setting on your pasta roller and run the rolled out dough through it three times.
  3. Briefly fold the short ends of the dough together to form a meeting point in the center of the rectangle, then fold the dough in half so that it is divided into four equal pieces.
  4. If the dough is springing back excessively, cover it with a kitchen towel and set it aside for 10 minutes to cool.
  5. Reduce the setting by one degree and run the pasta dough through the machine once, then reduce the setting by one degree after each run through the machine until you have achieved the desired thickness of pasta.
  6. On a Kitchenaid attachment, we stopped at the 5th setting for ordinary pasta.
  7. Make a halved pasta sheet if your pasta sheet grows too lengthy for you to work with.
See also:  How To Make Pasta Sauce

Use a clean kitchen towel to keep the dough from drying out.

Using a sharp knife, trim the edges of the dough to create a neat rectangle, then cut the pasta into the desired form.

Place the pasta on floured baking sheets and cover with a clean kitchen towel to keep the pasta from drying out while baking.

To prepare a meal, begin by preparing: Prepare a big pot of salted water by bringing it to a rolling boil.

After draining, add chosen sauce and toss to coat.

Easy Homemade Pasta Dough Recipe

Step-by-step directions on how to produce the ideal handmade pasta dough, complete with a slew of helpful hints and suggestions.

There is no need for a stand mixer; all you need is 15 minutes of your time! Using this recipe, you will learn how to prepare pasta dough from scratch. Because the dough is great for rolling out, there is no need for a pasta machine to make this dish.

How to make pasta dough at home

Making the ideal homemade pasta dough is easy when you follow these step-by-step directions, which include several helpful hints. This recipe just takes 15 minutes and does not require the use of a mixer. This article will teach you how to prepare pasta dough by hand using a food processor. There is no need for a pasta machine because the dough is great for rolling out.

  • After you have cut the dough into tagliatelle, pappardelle, or farfalle, the color of the pasta will change to a white-ish/pale tint once it has been cooked. The yolks are responsible for the golden hue. Only whole eggs were used in this recipe, so it would not be as yellow. If the dough appears to be firm and difficult to knead, add extra water to soften it. If the dough feels too soft, add extra flour. It is critical to allow the pasta dough to rest once it has been made. Thirty minutes is sufficient. Additionally, you will find that it will grow softer
  • Divide your homemade pasta dough into two equal portions in order to make rolling simpler. One should be wrapped in plastic wrap and kept away for later. Roll out the second piece when it has been formed into a ball. IMPORTANT: In order to produce the greatest results, the dough must be rolled out as thin as possible, almost like paper. A transparent hand or the surface of the tabletop that you are rolling on should be visible through it. Rolling does not necessitate the use of much flour. This is only for the worktop
  • Nothing more. It is recommended that half of this handmade pasta dough be flattened out to a minimum of 1512 inches (4030 cm). On top of that, it is easier to roll the pasta on the same day that it is made. It is possible that you may require extra power for rolling the next day.

Please keep in mind that if you leave this handmade pasta dough in the fridge overnight, the color will change. When the dough is kneaded several times, the color changes to a pale yellow. An older post has been updated with fresh photographs and a recipe that is easier to roll out by hand. The recipe has also been enhanced.

Homemade Pasta Dough

Step-by-step directions on how to produce the ideal handmade pasta dough, complete with a slew of helpful hints and suggestions. There is no need for a stand mixer; all you need is 15 minutes of your time! Preparation time: 15 minutes 15 minutes is the whole time. Servings:4Dough Calories:373

  • To begin, spread the flour out onto a clean work surface and form a well in the center. Fill the hole with egg yolks, egg whites, and olive oil until it is completely filled. a pinch of salt thrown in To begin, lightly whisk the eggs with a fork while gradually integrating the flour into the eggs, a little at a time
  • After the eggs and flour are blended together into an unruly dough, start working the dough by kneading. The dough will be crumbly at first, but it will come together as it rests. If you find that the mixture is too difficult to work with, you can add water at this point. Knead for a total of 10 minutes. A smooth dough should result from thorough mixing. Flatten it a little with your hand and cover it securely in plastic wrap to keep it from drying out. Refrigerate the dough for 30 minutes before rolling it out
  • The dough may then be smoothed out with a rolling pin after it has rested.
  1. It should be noted that the total duration does not include 30 minutes of rest time. Use eggs that are medium or big in size. If you find that the dough is too stiff and difficult to work with, add a little more water and continue kneading until the dough is smooth and elastic. It’ll all come together in the end
  2. This recipe yields around 12 ounces (340 grams) of fresh pasta when fully cooked. This recipe makes enough for three servings (or two big ones). For up to 2 days, you may keep this dough in the refrigerator. Just keep in mind that the longer it sits, the more difficult it is to roll. It will also lose its golden hue, but if you remove it from the oven and knead it numerous times, the color will return. Although it will not be as yellow as it was on the day of preparation, it will still be noticeable. It will take around 10 minutes to roll out the dough. Paper-thin is required because you need to be able to see your hand or the tabletop beneath it. I urge that you read the entire text if you want further information or if you have any questions.

The Main Course is the first course in the sequence. Cuisine:Italian Easy Pasta Dough Recipe, Homemade Pasta Dough Recipe, How to Make Pasta Dough are some of the terms used to describe this recipe. Nutritional Values Pasta Dough Made from Scratch Amount per Serving percent Daily Value** Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. **I earn money on qualifying purchases as an Amazon Associate. Follow us on Twitter @happyfoodstube and use the hashtag #happyfoodstube. COMMENT ON THIS PAGE

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The Main Course is the course that everyone should take. Cuisine:Italian Easy Pasta Dough Recipe, Homemade Pasta Dough Recipe, How to Make Pasta Dough are some of the keywords that people use to find recipes. Dietary Guidelines Pasta Dough Prepared at Home Amount per Serving percent Daily Value** Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. As an Amazon Associate, I earn money on qualifying purchases. Follow us on Twitter @happyfoodstube and use the hashtag #happyfoodstube ADD YOUR OPINION

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What ingredients go into a nutritious pasta dish? Pasta is a staple of the Mediterranean diet and may be used in a variety of ways.

How To Make Fresh Pasta from Scratch

We independently choose these items, and if you make a purchase after clicking on one of our links, we may receive a commission. Let us all sincerely pledge that this weekend we will take out the dusty pasta machine that has been tucked away on a high shelf and go to work on making some pasta. How many people are aware of how simple it is to cook pasta at home? It’s really simple! An excellent recipe for basic egg pasta, as well as a step-by-step walkthrough of the entire procedure, are provided here.

  1. Making the dough takes around 10 minutes, and then you have to let it rest for another 30 minutes before baking it.
  2. After the dough has rested, it will take another 10 to 20 minutes to roll it out and cut it, depending on how quickly you work and how many assistants you have.
  3. While it is possible to do the task on your own, it is extremely beneficial to have an extra set of hands, especially if you are hand-cranking the dough through a counter-top pasta rolling machine.
  4. As soon as you’ve finished making your pasta, you may cook it immediately, dry it, or freeze it for later use.

After four minutes in salted boiling water, taste it and continue to check in one-minute intervals until the pasta is al dente, roughly ten minutes total. Ready? Let’s get started with the spaghetti.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour, with a little extra for spreading out the pasta
  • 2 cups water
  • A half teaspoon of salt
  • Three big eggs

Equipment

  • Mixing bowl
  • Fork or dough whisk
  • Baking sheet Pasta machine (see Additional Notes for instructions on how to roll pasta by hand). Dishtowel and baking sheet are required.

Instructions

  1. Combine the Flour and Salt: In a medium-sized mixing basin, whisk together the flour and salt with a fork until well combined. Toss in the eggs: Make a deep well in the center of the flour and crack the eggs into it. Set the well aside to cool. To incorporate the eggs, use a fork to whisk them together. If you like, you may do this on the counter-top “Italian Grandmother Style,” but I think it’s simpler and less messy to make it in a mixing bowl. Instructions for using a food processor are provided below. Begin Putting the Flour and Eggs Together: As you beat the eggs, slowly begin to incorporate flour from the bottom and sides of the basin into the mixture. Do not rush through this phase. At first, the eggs will seem to be a slurry due to the lack of oxygen. Once you’ve added enough flour, the dough will begin to form into a very soft ball of dough. Don’t be concerned if you haven’t used the entire bag of flour. Prepare the Pasta Dough: Knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic. Turn the dough out onto a clean surface, removing any extra flour with it. Beginning with a gentle fold of the dough in on itself, flattening it, and folding it again, repeat the process. It will be quite soft at first, but will progressively stiffen up as time goes on. The dough should be kneaded once it has become hard enough to handle. More flour should be added as needed to prevent the dough from sticking to your hands or the countertop. Remove slices from the dough with a paring knife, and continue to work the dough if there are many air bubbles. kneaded dough is defined as dough that when sliced creates a smooth, elastic ball with only a few air bubbles in it. Rest the Pasta Dough for a Few Minutes: The mixing dish should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Cover the bowl with a dinner plate or plastic wrap to keep the dough ball from falling out. Rest for at least 30 minutes after your workout. Please keep in mind that the pasta dough can be refrigerated for up to 24 hours at this stage. Allow it to cool down to room temperature before rolling it out. The Pasta Dough should be divided as follows: Using a large spoon, scrape the ball of dough onto a baking sheet that has been generously sprinkled with flour (it will stick to the bowl
  2. Use a spatula or bowl scraper if necessary). Divide the dough into four equal halves and set them aside. Cover the parts with a clean dishtowel once they have been dusted with flour. Maintain in mind that the goal at this stage is to keep everything well-floured in order to avoid the spaghetti from clinging to itself or the roller while you are rolling it out. If the dough becomes sticky as you roll it out, sprinkle it with flour to prevent sticking. In addition, sprinkle flour over whatever pasta you aren’t currently working with (whether it is rolled, sliced, or otherwise) and cover it with a dishtowel
  3. Begin Making the Pasta: The Pasta is Rolled Out: The thickest setting on your pasta maker should be used (usually marked “1”). One piece of dough should be flattened into a thick disk between your palms before being sent through the pasta roller. Repeat the process one or twice more. Make a letter-folding motion with your hands to fold this piece of dough into thirds, then press it between your hands again. While the pasta machine is still on its largest setting, feed the pasta crosswise between the rollers of the machine to make ravioli (see picture). Feed it through one or twice more until it’s smooth and uniform in texture. If necessary, repeat the folding procedure. This aids in the strengthening of the gluten in the wheat, resulting in a chewier texture when the flour is cooked. Pasta should be thinned as follows: Start by adjusting the settings on your pasta roller to make the spaghetti thinner and thinner as you go. At each setting, roll the pasta two or three times, and don’t skip any of the settings (the pasta tends to snag and warp if you do). If the pasta becomes too long to handle, lay it down on a cutting board and cut it in half with a sharp knife. Using a rolling pin, roll the pasta as thin as you like. For linguine and fettuccine, I usually use the 6 or 7 setting on the KitchenAid attachment
  4. For angel hair or packed pastas, I go one or two levels thinner on the attachment. Using a pasta cutter, cut the pasta: Noodle length sheets (typically approximately 12 inches in length) should be cut from the lengthy stretch of dough. If you’re creating filled pasta or lasagna, you may start with the shape. If you want to cut the pasta sheet into noodles, move from the pasta roller to the noodle cutter and pass the sheet of pasta through the cutter until it becomes noodles. Toss the noodles with a little flour to prevent them from sticking together and place them in a large, open container. Prepare a dusted baking sheet and place this basket on it, covering it with a towel while you finish rolling and cutting the remainder of the dough. To make it easier to cut the pasta into noodles, I roll all of the pasta at the same time before cutting it into noodles. Sprinkle the sheets of pasta generously with flour and arrange them on a baking sheet dusted with flour and covered with a kitchen towel
  5. Whether you’re cooking, drying, or storing, Pasta that has been frozen: For quick cooking, bring a big pot of water to a boil, add salt to taste, and cook the pasta until al dente, approximately 4-5 minutes. To dry the pasta, spread it out over a clothes drying rack, coat hangers, or the back of a chair and allow it to air dry until it is absolutely brittle, about 30 minutes. You may keep it for many weeks in an airtight jar. To freeze, either lay the noodles out flat on a baking sheet or arrange them in a basket pattern on a baking sheet until totally frozen. Combine all of the ingredients in an airtight container and freeze for up to 3 months. It is possible that dried or frozen noodles will require an additional minute or two to cook.

Recipe Notes

Pasta Dough Made in a Food Processor: In the bowl of a food processor, combine all of the ingredients until smooth. After pulsing until everything is incorporated, turn the processor on constantly until a dough is created. Continue kneading and shaping the dough according to package directions. Pasta is made by rolling and cutting it by hand. It is possible to achieve success! Divide the dough into four equal pieces and roll each piece out as if it were a pasta roller, using a rolling pin to replicate the movement of the roller.

Sprinkle generously with flour the dough before carefully rolling it up.

Shake out the coils and mix them with flour before continuing with the frying.

Contributor Former editor for The Kitchn, Emma is a graduate of the Cambridge School for Culinary Arts and has worked in the food industry for several years.

For more information on her food, see her website.

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