How Many Carbs In Whole Wheat Pasta

Is Whole Wheat Pasta Really Any Healthier Than White Pasta?

For years, pasta has received a terrible reputation as being unhealthy, which is why carbohydrate enthusiasts throughout the world delighted when companies began promoting whole wheat pasta varieties. According to them, whole grains are beneficial to one’s health; thus, whole grain pasta must be the solution to their eating-well challenge. However, while the latter may be more nutrient-dense, the former is unquestionably more delicious. So, do you really have to give up flavor in order to get the health benefits?

The Claim:

Whole wheat pasta is more nutritious than white pasta because it has a higher concentration of nutrients such as complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, and zinc than white pasta. White pasta, on the other hand, is formed of refined carbohydrates, which means that it has been stripped of numerous nutrients during the production process.

The Evidence:

Here’s how they compare in terms of nutritional value. One serving (2 ounces) of whole wheat pasta provides the following nutrients:

  • Nutritional information: 180 calories
  • 39 grams of carbohydrates
  • 8 grams of protein
  • 7 grams of fiber
  • Minerals such as magnesium, iron, and zinc.

One serving (2 ounces) of white pasta comprises the following ingredients:

  • A 200-calorie meal with 42 grams of carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein, and 3 grams of fiber
  • Some iron but no magnesium or zinc

So, what exactly does that imply, exactly? Because refined grains are processed considerably more quickly than complex carbohydrates, they have been found to induce an increase in blood sugar and insulin levels. Because they are not as satisfying as complex carbohydrates, you may be more prone to overindulge, which can lead to obesity and the disorders that accompany it. Carbohydrates are your body’s primary source of fuel during a ride, and if you don’t consume enough of them, you’re likely to bonk.

For the minerals, magnesium helps to keep your blood pressure under control and your bones strong, iron provides you energy, and zinc helps to improve your immune system and speed the healing of any scrapes or bruises you may have had while driving.

The Verdict:

While whole wheat pasta has a slew of true health benefits, Rizzo believes that pushing yourself to eat something you don’t enjoy is a waste of time. For some, whole wheat pasta simply doesn’t taste as nice as traditional white spaghetti. “If you want to eat white spaghetti, go ahead and do it, but be mindful of the portion quantity,” Rizzo advises. ” “Most people should definitely eat two portions,” says the author. This material has been imported from another source. Visiting their website may allow you to access the same stuff in a different format, or it may provide you with even more information than you could get elsewhere.

While it is true that refined grains such as white pasta are thought to be higher on the scale, this may not be as significant as you may assume in the long run.

“Because people with diabetes require more carbohydrates in their diet, eating items that are higher on the glycemic index isn’t always a bad idea.” Furthermore, the glycemic index of individual meals does not take into consideration the way people really eat things in the real world: in combination rather than in isolation.

  1. The way you construct a meal has an impact on how quickly your blood sugar levels will rise and fall.
  2. Weil.
  3. You shouldn’t go crazy and serve up a heaping bowl of quinoa every day, and you should also pay attention to the other elements that go into putting together the meal.
  4. Another point to keep in mind: For those carbohydrate loading before a race, whole wheat pasta may really be a bad decision.
  5. What’s the bottom line?
  6. “I personally believe that certain meals should not be completely avoided,” Rizzo explains.

You may be able to discover further information on this and other related items at the website piano.io.

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Nutrition Facts
For a Serving Size of (g)
How many calories are in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of calories in Whole wheat pasta:Calories Calories from Fat(%)
% Daily Value *
How much fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of fat in Whole wheat pasta:Total Fat
How much saturated fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of saturated fat in Whole wheat pasta:Saturated fat
How much monounsaturated fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of monounsaturated fat in Whole wheat pasta:Monounsaturated fat
How much polyunsaturated fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of polyunsaturated fat in Whole wheat pasta:Polyunsaturated fat
How much sodium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of sodium in Whole wheat pasta:Sodium
How much potassium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of potassium in Whole wheat pasta:Potassium
How many carbs are in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of carbs in Whole wheat pasta:Carbohydrates
How many net carbs are in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of net carbs in Whole wheat pasta:Net carbs
How much sugar is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of sugar in Whole wheat pasta:Sugar
How much fiber is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of fiber in Whole wheat pasta:Fiber
How much protein is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of protein in Whole wheat pasta:Protein
Vitamins and minerals
How much Vitamin A is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin A in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin A
How much Vitamin A IU is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin A IU in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin A IU
How much Vitamin B6 is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin B6 in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin B6
How much Vitamin B12 is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin B12 in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin B12
How much Vitamin C is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin C in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin C
How much Vitamin D is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin D in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin D
How much Vitamin D IU is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin D IU in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin D IU
How much Vitamin E is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin E in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin E
How much Vitamin K is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin K in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin K
How much Caffeine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Caffeine in Whole wheat pasta:Caffeine
How much Calcium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Calcium in Whole wheat pasta:Calcium
How much Iron is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Iron in Whole wheat pasta:Iron
How much Magnesium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Magnesium in Whole wheat pasta:Magnesium
How much Phosphorus is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Phosphorus in Whole wheat pasta:Phosphorus
How much Zinc is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Zinc in Whole wheat pasta:Zinc
How much Copper is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Copper in Whole wheat pasta:Copper
How much Manganese is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Manganese in Whole wheat pasta:Manganese
How much Selenium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Selenium in Whole wheat pasta:Selenium
How much Retinol is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Retinol in Whole wheat pasta:Retinol
How much Lycopene is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Lycopene in Whole wheat pasta:Lycopene
How much Thiamine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Thiamine in Whole wheat pasta:Thiamine
How much Riboflavin is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Riboflavin in Whole wheat pasta:Riboflavin
How much Niacin is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Niacin in Whole wheat pasta:Niacin
How much Folate is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Folate in Whole wheat pasta:Folate
How much Choline is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Choline in Whole wheat pasta:Choline
How much Betaine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Betaine in Whole wheat pasta:Betaine
How much Water is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Water in Whole wheat pasta:Water
Fatty acids
Amino acids
How much Tryptophan is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Tryptophan in Whole wheat pasta:Tryptophan
How much Threonine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Threonine in Whole wheat pasta:Threonine
How much Isoleucine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Isoleucine in Whole wheat pasta:Isoleucine
How much Leucine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Leucine in Whole wheat pasta:Leucine
How much Lysine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Lysine in Whole wheat pasta:Lysine
How much Methionine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Methionine in Whole wheat pasta:Methionine
How much Cystine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Cystine in Whole wheat pasta:Cystine
How much Phenylalanine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Phenylalanine in Whole wheat pasta:Phenylalanine
How much Tyrosine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Tyrosine in Whole wheat pasta:Tyrosine
How much Valine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Valine in Whole wheat pasta:Valine
How much Arginine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Arginine in Whole wheat pasta:Arginine
How much Histidine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Histidine in Whole wheat pasta:Histidine
How much Alanine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Alanine in Whole wheat pasta:Alanine
How much Aspartic acid is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Aspartic acid in Whole wheat pasta:Aspartic acid
How much Glutamic acid is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Glutamic acid in Whole wheat pasta:Glutamic acid
How much Glycine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Glycine in Whole wheat pasta:Glycine
How much Proline is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Proline in Whole wheat pasta:Proline
How much Serine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Serine in Whole wheat pasta:Serine
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs.
See also:  How Do You Make Pasta

Whole Grain Spaghetti: Nutrition Facts & More

Barilla® Whole Grain Spaghetti is made from a single basic ingredient: whole grain durum wheat flour. It is a high-fiber dish that contains no added sugar. Those looking to improve their diet of fiber and whole grains without compromising taste will find this pasta to be an excellent choice. Barilla Whole Grain Pasta is manufactured using ingredients that are not genetically modified. Please see our stance statement for further details.

Perfect for.

Spaghetti is the most popular form in Italy, and it’s easy to see why. The term “spaghi” derives from the Italian word “spaghetti,” which literally translates as “cord lengths.” Spaghetti is a type of pasta that originated in southern Italy and is frequently served with tomato sauce, fresh vegetables, or seafood. With Barilla Whole Grain Spaghetti, you can count on every mouthful to be properly “al dente,” with the delightful taste and texture you expect in every bite.

Suitable For

More Information about Allergens

IngredientsNutrition

To improve the flavor of the pasta, add a good pinch of sea salt to the boiling water before adding the pasta. Oil should not be added to the water since it hinders the sauce from adhering to the pasta. Please see our Help and Support page for further cooking suggestions.

COOKING YOUR PASTA

Preparation: Bring 4 to 6 quarts of water to a boil, season with salt to taste. Fill a pot halfway with boiling water and add the contents of the packet. Gently stir the ingredients together. Bring the water back to a boil. Cook the pasta for 7 minutes, uncovered and stirring occasionally, to achieve the original “al dente” texture. Boil the pasta for an extra 1 minute if you want it more tender. Remove the pan from the heat. Drain the water well. Make a quick sauce using your favorite Barilla sauce and serve immediately.

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Our products are the result of almost 140 years of Italian devotion. Read on to find out more

Carbohydrate Value of Pasta vs. Whole-Grain Pasta

After a hard day at the office or at home with the kids, you might decide that spaghetti is the best thing to have for supper today. After all, a plate of spaghetti is tasty and quick to prepare while also being inexpensive and inexpensive. Making the decision between standard pasta and whole-grain pasta may prove to be the most difficult step. It is typically recommended that whole-grain pasta be used instead of normal white pasta since it has more fiber and minerals.

Carb Content

Carbohydrates are a type of energy that the body uses. They also have a role in the operation of the brain and are essential to the functioning of the neurological system. Pasta is a healthy source of carbohydrates in general. The carbohydrate content of whole-grain pastas and standard pastas varies based on the kind of pasta consumed. The carbohydrate content of a 2-ounce portion of standard angel hair pasta is around 31 grams. There are 41 grams in a serving of whole-wheat, whole-grain angel hair that is the same size as before.

The typical individual should have 130 grams of carbohydrates each day, according to the USDA.

In order to sustain energy levels, athletes who engage in prolonged bouts of high-intensity activity require more calories. In accordance with Iowa State University recommendations, a daily consumption of a minimum of 250 grams is advised.

Complex vs. Simple Carbs

Carbohydrates may be divided into two categories: simple carbohydrate and complicated carbohydrate. Simple carbohydrates are composed of one or two sugar molecules and are metabolized at a quick rate. As a result, there is a rapid increase in energy followed by an equally rapid decrease in energy. Simple carbohydrates are found in large quantities in refined and processed foods such as cakes, cookies, pastries, white bread, and sweets. Complex carbohydrates are made up of many sugar molecules and are often referred to as starchy meals.

The carbohydrate complex included in both regular and whole-grain pasta is the same.

Net Carbs in Pasta

Fiber is a form of carbohydrate that does not break down in the digestive system and is therefore beneficial. The net carbohydrate count of a food is calculated by subtracting the total carbohydrate count from the net carbohydrate count. For example, 2 ounces of spaghetti has 44 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of fiber, resulting in a net carbohydrate content of 42 grams of carbohydrates. Whole-grain spaghetti has 40 grams of carbohydrates and 5 grams of fiber, resulting in a net carbohydrate content of 35 grams of carbohydrates.

Whole grains maintain more fiber and nutrients than refined grains since they have the bran, germ, and endosperm.

Glycemic Index

In nutrition, the glycemic index, sometimes known as the GI, is a rating system that indicates how quickly a carbohydrate item raises blood glucose levels. In response to eating high-GI foods, your blood sugar levels rapidly increase. This prompts you to release large quantities of insulin from your pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that stimulates fat accumulation, hence it contributes to weight gain. Low-GI meals have a delayed release of glucose into the bloodstream, which can assist to prevent excessive weight gain.

Contrary to popular opinion, normal and whole-grain pasta have GI values that are quite near to one another.

Considerations

The carbohydrate content of pasta and whole-grain pasta remains constant, but the total quantity of carbohydrates in your meal might fluctuate significantly. For example, if you serve either type of pasta with a sweet red sauce, the carbohydrate level of your meal would rise significantly.

Can You Eat Whole-Wheat Pasta on a Low-Carb Diet?

When following a low-carb diet, whole wheat pasta can be consumed. Image courtesy of Lilechka75/iStock/Getty Images (original). According to the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University, a low-carbohydrate diet may help people lose weight more rapidly than a low-fat diet, and it may also help them maintain that weight reduction.

Therefore, if you’re a pasta connoisseur who’s embarking on a low-carb journey, it’s only normal to be inquisitive about the carb amount of whole wheat pasta.

Tip

Whole-wheat spaghetti may rapidly fill up the daily carbohydrate allowance on a low-carb diet. But it delivers high-quality, nutrient-dense carbs, making it a viable alternative worth considering. While the words “pasta” and “low-carbohydrate” have about as much in common as the words “night” and “day,” it’s important to realize that low-carbohydrate diets are not the same as zero-carbohydrate diets in terms of nutritional value. Given that low-carbohydrate diets are focused on lowering carbohydrate intake rather than removing it entirely, whole wheat pasta may still have a place on the low-carbohydrate plate — provided that it is consumed in moderation.

What Is Whole-Wheat Pasta?

Despite the fact that normal wheat pasta is created from refined flour, according to Consumer Reports, it is not a nutritionally devoid product. A form of wheat flour known as durum wheat, commonly known as semolina, is used to manufacture pasta. It has a greater protein level than most other wheat flours, making it an excellent choice for making pasta. If you’re trying to reduce your carbohydrate intake, you’ll want to make sure that every carbohydrate you ingest has the most nutritional benefit possible.

While refined grains are stripped of many of their most nutritious components during the refining process, whole grains maintain all of the kernel’s components, including the bran, germ, and endosperm, and are thus more nutritious.

Chan School of Public Health, wheat bran is a good source of fiber, iron, B vitamins, magnesium, antioxidants, zinc, and other nutrients, as well as certain disease-fighting phytochemicals, among other things.

Making certain that the carbs you consume are high in nutritional content will help you maintain a well-balanced diet if you are only consuming a restricted quantity of carbohydrates.

Whole-Wheat Pasta Nutrition Facts

As it turns out, the high calorie content of pasta may have caused a bit more commotion than was necessary. Approximately 200 calories are contained in a half cup of branded, off the shelf whole-wheat pasta manufactured from organic, whole-wheat semolina, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. What is the carbohydrate content of whole wheat pasta? The same serving size provides around 43 grams of carbs. According to the same USDA source, whole-wheat pasta is nutritionally comparable to conventional durum wheat semolina pasta in terms of calories and carbs.

Similar to the protein amount, the protein content in both varieties of pasta is frequently pretty similar. Whole-wheat pasta, as opposed to pasta manufactured from refined flour, may have lower salt content.

Pasta and Low-Carb Diets

The Food and Drug Administration advises a daily carbohydrate load of 300 to 375 grams for a typical 2,000 or 2,500 calorie diet, depending on the amount of calories consumed. When it comes to low-carbohydrate diets, there is no hard and fast rule. It is basically what it sounds like: a low-carbohydrate diet is one that restricts the amount of carbs consumed on a daily basis. StatPearls describes a range of dietary carbohydrate consumption as follows, in broad strokes:

  • A very low-carbohydrate diet is one in which carbohydrates account for less than 10% of total daily macronutrient consumption, or around 20 to 50 grams per day. a low-carbohydrate diet in which carbohydrates account for less than 26 percent of total daily macronutrient consumption, or less than 130 grams daily A moderate-carbohydrate diet is one in which carbohydrates account for around 26 to 44 percent of total daily macronutrient intake, or 130 to 260 grams per day.
See also:  How Much Pasta Is A Serving

The Mayo Clinic typically agrees on this point, classifying a low-carbohydrate diet as one that contains a daily limit of around 20 to 60 grams of carbs and provides approximately 80 to 240 calories per day. On the basis of the normal carbohydrate content of whole-wheat pasta, a single half-cup portion of whole-wheat pasta would generally be sufficient to meet your carbohydrate requirements for the whole day on a low-carbohydrate eating regimen. On a moderate-carbohydrate diet, a cup will provide the same amount of energy.

As previously said, the benefit of substituting whole-wheat pasta for conventional pasta is the nutritional content that you are adding to those carbs.

More Whole-Grain Benefits

However, while low-carbohydrate dieters won’t be able to go crazy with their whole-wheat pasta amounts, the health advantages provided by whole grains make them more than worth a second look when it comes to achieving daily carbohydrate requirements. Pasta is only one of the many ways to get the advantages of these ingredients. Low-carbohydrate diets are popular because they help people lose weight, lower their risk of heart disease, and enhance cardio-metabolic function, all of which Harvard University has confirmed low-carbohydrate diets can accomplish efficiently.

But more than that, the higher fiber content of whole wheat and whole grain products can aid in decreasing cholesterol, moving waste materials through the digestive system, and breaking up blood clots, which can all contribute to cardiac issues in the long run.

If you’re watching your carb intake, whole-wheat pasta is a good option to choose from.

Whole grains that have not been processed, such as amaranth, barley, millet, quinoa, buckwheat, rye, bulgur, and wild rice, are recommended by Harvard because they provide a “full bundle” of health advantages, according to the university.

Low-Carb Pasta Alternatives

However, while low-carbohydrate dieters won’t be able to go crazy with their whole-wheat pasta amounts, the health advantages provided by whole grains make them more than worth a second look when it comes to reaching daily carbohydrate objectives. One method to reap the advantages of these nutrients is through pasta. Low-carbohydrate diets are popular because they help people lose weight, lower their risk of heart disease, and enhance cardio-metabolic function, all of which Harvard University has found to be true.

But more than that, the higher fiber content of whole wheat and whole grain products can aid in decreasing cholesterol, transporting waste materials through the digestive system, and breaking up blood clots, which can all contribute to heart disease in the long run.

These phytochemicals include magnesium, selenium, and copper.

Whole grains that have not been processed, such as amaranth, barley, millet, quinoa, buckwheat, rye, bulgur, and wild rice, are recommended by Harvard because they provide a “full package” of health advantages, according to the university’s nutrition department.

Calories in Whole Wheat Macaroni and Nutrition Facts

While low-carbohydrate dieters won’t be able to go crazy with their whole-wheat pasta amounts, the advantages afforded by whole grains make them more than worth a second look when it comes to fulfilling daily carbohydrate objectives. Pasta is only one of the many ways to get the advantages of these foods. Low-carbohydrate diets are popular because they help people lose weight, lower their risk of heart disease, and enhance cardio-metabolic function, all of which Harvard University has confirmed low-carbohydrate diets can accomplish.

But more than that, the higher fiber content of whole wheat and whole grain products can aid in decreasing cholesterol, transporting waste materials through the digestive system, and breaking up blood clots, which can all contribute to heart disease.

If you’re watching your carb intake, whole-wheat pasta is a good alternative.

Calorie Breakdown:Carbohydrate (80%)Fat (4%)Protein (16%)

The following calculations were made using an RDI of 2000 calories: What is my Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for this supplement?

Photos

There are172 caloriesin 1 cup of cooked Whole Wheat Macaroni.
Calorie breakdown:4% fat, 80% carbs, 16% protein.

Common Serving Sizes:

Serving Size Calories
1 lasagna noodle, cooked 68
1 oz, dry, yields 96
100 g 123
1 cup cooked 172
1 cup, dry, yields 437

Related Types of Macaroni:

Creamed Macaroni
Macaroni or Noodles with Cheese
Macaroni
Vegetable Macaroni
Spinach Macaroni
view more macaroni nutritional info

Related Types of Pasta:

Whole Wheat Spaghetti
Pasta with Meat Sauce
Meatless Pasta with Tomato Sauce
Spaghetti
Lasagna with Meat
view more pasta nutritional info

See Also:

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Archer Farms Savory Swiss Whole Wheat MacaroniCheese
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Whole Wheat Macaroni (Cooked)
Essential Everyday Whole Wheat Elbow Macaroni
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You should keep in mind that some meals may not be suited for all persons, and you should consult with your doctor before commencing any weight reduction program or diet plan. Although FatSecret provides the material on this site in good faith and with the belief that it is true, FatSecret makes no claims or guarantees as to its completeness or accuracy, and you should use any information, including nutritional values, at your own risk. Each and every trademark, copyright, and other type of intellectual property is owned by a specific individual or organization.

Calories in Homemade Whole Wheat Pasta – Calorie, Fat, Carb, Fiber, and Protein Info

Please keep in mind that some foods may not be suitable for all people, and you are strongly advised to seek medical counsel before commencing any weight reduction program or diet plan. Although FatSecret provides the material on this site in good faith and with the belief that it is accurate, FatSecret makes no claims or guarantees as to its completeness or accuracy, and you should use any information, including nutritional values, at your own risk. Each and every trademark, copyright, and other type of intellectual property is owned by a specific individual or corporation.

Calories 189.5
Total Fat 3.3 g
Saturated Fat 0.9 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.3 g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.0 g
Cholesterol 106.3 mg
Sodium 322.2 mg
Potassium 30.3 mg
Total Carbohydrate 33.3 g
Dietary Fiber 5.5 g
Sugars 0.0 g
Protein 9.1 g
Vitamin A 3.2 %
Vitamin B-12 4.2 %
Vitamin B-6 1.7 %
Vitamin C 0.0 %
Vitamin D 3.2 %
Vitamin E 1.3 %
Calcium 1.2 %
Copper 0.2 %
Folate 2.9 %
Iron 2.0 %
Magnesium 0.6 %
Manganese 0.3 %
Niacin 0.1 %
Pantothenic Acid 3.1 %
Phosphorus 4.4 %
Riboflavin 7.5 %
Selenium 11.0 %
Thiamin 1.0 %
Zinc 1.8 %

In this table, the percent daily values (%DV) are calculated on the basis of a 2,000 calorie diet. Depending on your calorie requirements, your daily values may be greater or fewer than the recommended amounts.

Calories per Ingredient

The following items were selected from our food nutrition database and utilized in the nutrition calculations for this dish. Homemade Whole Wheat Pasta has a calorie count of 120 calories per serving. Whole Wheat Flour contains 154 calories (0.38 cup) Egg, fresh, whole, and uncooked contains 36 calories (0.50 large) Salt has zero calories (0.13 tsp)

Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat nutrition facts and analysis.

Nutrition Facts
Portion Size 117 g
Amount Per Portion 174
Calories
% Daily Value *
Total Fat2g 3 %
Saturated Fat 0.3g 2 %
Sodium4.7mg 0 %
Total Carbohydrate35g 13 %
Dietary Fiber 4.6g 16 %
Sugar 0.9g
Protein7g 14 %
Vitamin D 0mcg 0 %
Calcium 15mg 1 %
Iron 2mg 11 %
Potassium 112mg 2 %
* The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contribute to a daily diet.2000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
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Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat nutrition facts and analysis per 1 cup spaghetti not packed (117 g)

Vitamins
Nutrient Amount DV
Vitamin A, RAE 0.00 mcg 0 %
Carotene, alpha 0.00 mcg
Carotene, beta 2.34 mcg
Cryptoxanthin, beta 0.00 mcg
Lutein+zeaxanthin 109.98 mcg
Lycopene 0.00 mcg
Retinol 0.00 mcg
Thiamin 0.183 mg 15 %
Riboflavin 0.116 mg 9 %
Niacin 3.657 mg 23 %
Pantothenic acid 0.314 mg 6 %
Vitamin B6 0.109 mg 8 %
Vitamin B12 0.00 mcg 0 %
Vitamin B12, added 0.00 mcg
Folate, DFE 24.57 mcg 6 %
Folate, food 24.57 mcg
Folic acid 0.00 mcg
Vitamin C 0.0 mg 0 %
Vitamin D 0.00 mcg 0 %
Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) 0.27 mg 1 %
Vitamin E, added 0.00 mg
Tocopherol, alpha 0.27 mg
Tocopherol, beta 0.09 mg
Tocopherol, delta 0.00 mg
Tocopherol, gamma 0.11 mg
Tocotrienol, alpha 0.21 mg
Tocotrienol, beta 1.36 mg
Tocotrienol, delta 0.00 mg
Tocotrienol, gamma 0.00 mg
Vitamin K 0.7 mcg 1 %
Vitamin K1 0.7 mcg
Vitamin K2 0.0 mcg
Dihydro phylloquinone 0.0 mcg
Choline 7.6 mg
Minerals
Nutrient Amount DV
Calcium, Ca 15.21 mg 1 %
Copper, Cu 0.26 mg 29 %
Iron, Fe 2.01 mg 11 %
Magnesium, Mg 63.18 mg 16 %
Manganese, Mn 1.546 mg 67 %
Phosphorus, P 148.59 mg 21 %
Potassium, K 112.32 mg 2 %
Selenium, Se 42.47 mcg 77 %
Sodium, Na 4.68 mg 0 %
Zinc, Zn 1.57 mg 14 %
Proteins and Aminoacids
Nutrient Amount DV
Protein 7.01 g 14 %
Alanine 0.218 g
Arginine 0.247 g
Aspartic acid 0.316 g
Cystine 0.146 g
Glutamic acid 2.427 g
Glycine 0.254 g
Histidine 0.164 g 23 %
Isoleucine 0.271 g 19 %
Leucine 0.479 g 18 %
Lysine 0.156 g 7 %
Methionine 0.113 g
Phenylalanine 0.349 g
Proline 0.746 g
Serine 0.342 g
Threonine 0.188 g 18 %
Tryptophan 0.090 g 32 %
Tyrosine 0.183 g
Valine 0.303 g 17 %
Phenylalanine+Tyrosine 0.532 g 30 %
Methionine+Cysteine 0.113 g 11 %
Carbohydrates
Nutrient Amount DV
Carbohydrate 35.18 g 13 %
Fiber 4.56 g 16 %
Starch 29.85 g
Sugars 0.88 g
Fructose 0.08 g
Galactose 0.00 g
Glucose 0.08 g
Lactose 0.00 g
Maltose 0.47 g
Sucrose 0.23 g
Net carbs 30.62 g
Omega-3 Omega-6 Omega-6 / Omega-3 ratio
0.04 g 0.63 g 15.75
Nutrient Amount DV
Fat 2.001 g 3 %
Saturated fatty acids 0.284 g 1 %
Butanoic acid 0.000 g
Decanoic acid 0.000 g
Docosanoic acid 0.004 g
Dodecanoic acid 0.000 g
Eicosanoic acid 0.002 g
Heptadecanoic acid 0.001 g
Hexadecanoic acid 0.242 g
Hexanoic acid 0.000 g
Octadecanoic acid 0.025 g
Octanoic acid 0.000 g
Pentadecanoic acid 0.004 g
Tetracosanoic acid 0.002 g
Tetradecanoic acid 0.005 g
Monounsaturated fatty acids 0.206 g
Cis-hexadecenoic acid 0.002 g
Cis-octadecenoic acid 0.197 g
Docosenoic acid 0.000 g
Docosenoic cis acid 0.000 g
Docosenoic trans acid 0.000 g
Eicosenoic acid 0.007 g
Heptadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Hexadecenoic acid 0.002 g
Octadecenoic acid 0.197 g
Pentadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Tetracosenoic cis acid 0.000 g
Tetradecenoic acid 0.000 g
Trans-hexadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Trans-octadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Polyunsaturated fatty acids 0.672 g
α-linolenic acid n-3 (ALA) 0.04 g
γ-linolenic acid n-6 (GLA) 0.00 g
Cis,cis-eicosadienoic n-6 acid 0.000 g
Linoleic acid n-6 (LA) 0.63 g
Docosahexaenoic n-3 acid (DHA) 0.000 g
Docosapentaenoic n-3 acid (DPA) 0.000 g
Docosatetraenoic acid 0.000 g
Eicosadienoic acid 0.000 g
Eicosadienoic n-3 acid 0.000 g
Eicosadienoic n-6 acid 0.000 g
Eicosapentaenoic n-3 acid (EPA) 0.000 g
Eicosatetraenoic acid 0.000 g
Octadecadienoic CLAs acid 0.000 g
Octadecadienoic acid 0.629 g
Octadecatetraenoic acid 0.000 g
Octadecatrienoic acid 0.042 g
Trans-octadecadienoic acid 0.000 g
Trans-octadecatrienoic acid 0.000 g
Fatty acids, total trans 0.000 g
Fatty acids, total trans-monoenoic 0.000 g
Fatty acids, total trans-polyenoic 0.000 g
Other
Nutrient Amount DV
Alcohol, ethyl 0.0 g
Ash 0.51 g
Caffeine 0.00 mg
Theobromine 0.00 mg
Water 72.31 g

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Pasta, cooked, whole-wheatcontains 174 calories per 117 g serving. This serving contains 2 g of fat, 7 g of protein and 35 g of carbohydrate. The latter is 0.9 g sugar and 4.6 g of dietary fiber, the rest is complex carbohydrate. Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat contains 0.3 g of saturated fat and 0 mg of cholesterol per serving. 117 g of Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat containsIU vitamin A, 0.0 mg of vitamin C and 0.00 mcg of vitamin D as well as 2.01 mg of iron, 15.21 mg of calcium and 112 mg of potassium. Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat belong to ‘Cereal Grains and Pasta’ food category.
Food properties
Source USDA Standard reference
Category Cereal Grains and Pasta

How many carbs are in whole wheat pasta?

The Nutrient Content of Whole-Grain Pasta vs. Refined Pasta

Whole – Wheat Spaghetti Refined/EnrichedSpaghetti
Calories 174 220
Protein 7.5 grams 8.1 grams
Carbs 37 grams 43 grams
Fiber 6 grams 2.5 grams

Nutritional Values

Calories 176 (736 kJ)
Total Carbohydrate 37.7 g 13%
Dietary Fiber 4 g 16%
Sugars 1.1 g
Protein 7.6 g

It is also possible to inquire as to which pasta contains the fewest carbohydrates. Below are eight low-carb pasta recipes that are higher in protein and fiber than your typical bowties.

  1. Explore Cuisine Edamame Spaghetti
  2. Barilla Red Lentil Penne
  3. Capello’s Almond Flour Fettuccine
  4. Explore Cuisine Green Lentil Lasagne
  5. Tolerant Black Bean Rotini
  6. Explore Cuisine Edamame Spaghetti
  7. Barilla Red Lent

One can also wonder if whole wheat pasta has a reduced carbohydrate content. With 37 grams of carbs, including 6 grams of fiber, the same quantity of whole – wheat pasta is just marginally healthier than the white kind (22). SUMMARY Both normal and whole-wheat pasta contain a lot of carbohydrates. Spiralized veggies or shiratakinoodles are low-carb options that are both healthful and delicious. When it comes to whole wheat pasta, how many calories does it have? Here’s how they compare in terms of nutritional value: One serving of whole wheat pasta (about 2 ounces) has 180 calories, 39 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and minerals such as magnesium, iron, and zinc, among others.

Nutrition Facts for Whole Wheat Pasta

spaghetti not packed in 1 cup whole-wheat pasta (this includes foods intended for the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Distribution Program).

What are the sources of the calories? Protein accounts for 15% of total calories (7g) 9 percent of the calories come from fat (2g) Carbohydrates account for 75% of calories (35g) Statistics in a Nutshell

  • Carbohydrates: 35 g, 9 percent DV
  • Calories: 174, 9 percent DV
  • Protein: 7 grams, 14 percent DV
  • Fat2 grams, 3 percent DV
  • Fiber4.6 g (16 percent DV)
  • Sugar0.9 g (2 percent DV)
  • Sodium4.7 mg (0 percent DV)
  • Calcium15 mg (1 percent DV)
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
1 cup spaghetti not packed (117g)
Calories 174
% Daily Value *
Total Fat2g 3%
Saturated Fat0.3g 1%
TransFat0g
Cholesterol0mg 0%
Sodium4.7mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate35.2g 12%
Dietary Fiber4.6g 16%
Total Sugars0.9g 2%
Includes~gAdded Sugars ~%
Protein7g 14%
Vitamin C0mg 0%
Vitamin D0μg 0%
Iron2mg 11%
Calcium15.2mg 1%
Potassium112.3mg 2%
Phosphorus148.6mg 12%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

What is the composition of this food? water (62 percent), fat (2 percent), carbohydrates (30 percent), protein (6%).

The Nutrition of Whole Wheat Pasta / Nutrition / Healthy Eating

In order to maintain a balanced diet, 45-65 percent of calories should come from carbs. Many individuals consider pasta to be their favorite carbohydrate dish. As with other carbs in your diet, you should choose complex carbohydrates or carbohydrates that are naturally present in foods such as fruits, legumes, and vegetables whenever possible. Complex carbs are significant because they still include the elements that are necessary for good health to function properly. Beans, vegetables, peas, and whole grains are examples of foods that contain them.

Although complex carbs are used as fuel by the body, they are also beneficial because they include vitamins, minerals, and fiber that are not always present in simple carbohydrate products such as white pasta or white flour that are processed.

Choosing whole wheat or whole grain pasta as a complex carbohydrate source is a fantastic decision.

However, the popularity of whole grain options has resulted in a significant improvement in the goods available recently, so if you haven’t tried whole wheat pasta yet, you should!

Pasta Selections are Compared Upon closer inspection of the labels of whole wheat/grain pastas, you may see that many of them refer to “whole durum wheat flour” or “whole semolina flour,” respectively.

Choose whole grain goods that are high in fiber and protein since occasionally the product may be dark due to food additives such as molasses, and this does not always indicate that it is a whole grain.

It is a low-fat diet that also includes high amounts of manganese and selenium, which are minerals that are crucial in the maintenance of bone health and the operation of the immune system.

According to the USDA, “Whole grains and other sources of dietary fiber may help lower blood cholesterol levels and may reduce the risk of heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, among other health benefits.

It aids in the relief of constipation and diverticulosis.

Fiber accomplishes this by slowing down the digestion of food, and some fiber is not digested but instead flows through your body, further improving bowel function and eliminating constipation.

The Most Common Vegan Diet Deficiencies and How to Avoid Them Emily DeLaceyMS, RD is a Registered Dietitian who is now working in Jamaica as an HIV/AIDS Prevention Specialist for the National HIV/AIDS Prevention Program.

She participated as a United States Peace Corps Volunteer in Malawi from 2012 to 2014, where she worked as a Community Health Advisor in a remote town, where she was able to experience the delights of living without power or running water for the first time.

She has been to more than 20 countries and 47 of the 50 states in the United States. As a result of her travels, adventures, and exposure to many cultures, she has become a passionate champion for the equality of nutrition and wellbeing for all people.

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