When To Add Wine To Pasta Sauce

Red Wine Pasta Sauce

This red wine pasta sauce is packed with flavor, looks lovely, and is surprisingly simple to prepare! This is the perfect spot to come if you have leftover red wine or if you’re seeking for a spaghetti sauce that will really impress your guests! The secret to preparing the greatest sauce is to start with high-quality ingredients. To make this dish, look for high-quality crushed tomatoes and fresh oregano (if possible). You should also choose a red wine that you love drinking. To be sure, you may make this sauce with any type of wine, but the better quality wine you choose will result in a more flavorful result.

This sauce is:

  • Light and delicious
  • Tangy
  • Savory
  • Vegetarian
  • Versatile
  • Vegan-optional
  • Light and flavorful

What red wine is best for pasta sauce?

The solution to this question is divided into two parts. First and foremost, I propose a robust, dry red wine such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Côtes du Rhône, or Zinfandel as the base for your dish. The maximum flavor depth will be achieved by using a dry red wine. And, if I’m going to cook with wine, I want to be able to taste it, in my view. The second half of my response is that you may use whatever you want! When cooking with wine, it’s better to choose a bottle that you’d genuinely like drinking yourself afterward.

No, not at all.

Because this recipe only calls for one cup of wine, you’ll have enough left over to enjoy on its own or to incorporate into other dishes.

How to make red wine pasta sauce

This dish is dubbed “fast” for a reason, as you will see below. I wanted to develop a sauce that was rich in taste and elegant in appearance, but that didn’t need the amount of time that is often required for those sorts of sauces. I do a couple things in order to acquire a lot of flavor in a short period of time. In order to allow the onion to “melt” into the sauce and infuse flavor without adding huge pieces of onion, I first shred it into a small bowl. To begin with, I sauté the garlic for a little longer than most recipes call for, which allows it to become golden brown (not burned!) rather than charred.

Add a full spoonful of honey to the dish as a last step to counterbalance the acidity of the tomatoes and red wine.

The basic steps for making this red wine pasta sauce:

  1. Cook the onion and oregano in oil until softened and beginning to turn golden brown
  2. Remove from heat and set aside. Cook until the garlic is golden brown, then remove from the heat. Stir in half a cup of wine and allow it to nearly entirely evaporate before serving. Cook until the wine has been reduced by at least half, adding the remaining half cup at the end. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, after adding the tomato and honey. Stir in the basil after turning off the heat and season with salt and pepper to taste.

How to use red wine pasta sauce

  • Served with spaghetti or penne pasta Make a vegetable pasta dish by tossing with zucchini noodles. Alternatively, reduce the quantity by a couple of cups and serve as marinara sauce on pizza or in lasagna. Baked eggs in tomato sauce (also known as shakshuka or eggs in purgatory) can be made using the sauce. White beans simmered in tomato sauce with a drizzle of olive oil on top and served with crusty bread make for a simple meal
  • Mussels with tomato sauce, steamed and served on crusty bread Serve as a dip for grilled cheese sandwiches. Make lasagne, lasagne roll-ups, or lasagne in a spaghetti squash shell.

7 ways to use leftover red wine:

  • Infuse red wine into dark chocolate truffles for a decadent treat. Make some asangria. Red wine-braised lamb shanks are a delicious dish. Poach pears in red wine until soft
  • Freeze the mixture into ice cubes and use as required in the kitchen
  • Make a fruit compote laced with wine
  • Make a pan sauce with red wine to serve with roasted pork

You may also like…

  • Vegan Sweet Potato Ravioli
  • Saucy Gochujang Noodles
  • Trapanese Pesto Pasta
  • Carrot Top Pesto Pasta
  • Browned Butter Garlic Noodles
  • Aged Gouda Spaghetti Alla Carbonara

In the event that you make this red wine pasta sauce, please tag me on Instagram @ZESTFULKITCHEN or leave a comment below! To pin this recipe and store it for later, click on the button on any of the photographs, or on the red button in the sidebar or below the recipe to save it for future reference. Good luck in the kitchen! Print

Description

This homemade red wine sauce is full of flavor, savory, and slightly acidic, and it makes for a simple and lovely supper!

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • 12 cup shredded onion*
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh oregano (or 1 teaspoon dried)
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, divided
  • Seasoning with salt and pepper
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced 2 (28-ounce) cans crushed tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 cup dry red wine (cotes du Rhone, cabernet sauvignon, or zinfandel)
  • 1 cup dry white wine (cotes du Rhône, cabernet sauvignon, or zinfandel)
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped basil, plus more to your liking
  • 2 pounds pasta made from whole wheat, such as spaghetti or penne

In a large pan, heat 2 tablespoons oil over medium heat until shimmering. Cook, turning occasionally, until the onion is softened and lightly browned, 5–7 minutes. Add the oregano and the remaining 12 teaspoon salt and mix until combined. Cook for 1–2 minutes, stirring constantly, until the garlic is gently golden brown. Cook for about 2 minutes, stirring constantly, until the wine is nearly completely evaporated. Cook until the remaining 12 cup has been reduced by at least half and a trail can be seen when a spatula is pushed through it, about 6 minutes total time.

Cook for approximately 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the sauce has somewhat thickened. Stir in the tomatoes and honey and bring to a boil. Stir in the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and basil once the heat has been turned off; season with extra basil, salt, and pepper to taste before serving.

Notes

Sauce may be kept in the refrigerator for up to 5 days if it is stored in an airtight container. Refrigerate for up to 4 months after storing in resealable zipper-lock bags in the freezer.

Nutrition

  • 12 cup sauce
  • 113 calories
  • 5 grams of sugar
  • 371 milligrams of sodium
  • 3 grams of fat
  • 0 grams of saturated fat
  • 10 grams of carbohydrates
  • 2 grams of fiber
  • 2 grams of protein
  • 0 milligrams of cholesterol

Red wine pasta sauce, homemade pasta sauce, red wine pasta, red wine pasta sauce The Recipe Card is driven by Lauren Grant, who works as a professional culinary food scientist, food writer, recipe creator, and food photographer in the food and hospitality industry. Lauren used to work as a magazine editor and test kitchen developer, and her work has appeared in a number of national publications, including Diabetic Living Magazine, Midwest Living Magazine, Cuisine at Home Magazine, EatingWell.com, AmericasTestKitchen.com, and others.

Reader Interactions

17Jul If you’ve spent any time at all creating homemade spaghetti sauce, you’ve almost certainly used red wine. And if you’ve ever used jarred spaghetti sauce when you’re in a hurry, you may have noticed that it contains red wine. This is due to the fact that adding a dash of red to your spaghetti sauce is a simple technique to greatly improve the tastes (and a number of other dishes). The key lies in grasping a few concepts, such as the function of alcohol and the appropriate amount to consume.

Flavor Boost

Because of the alcohol in your red wine, the fats (such as olive oil or butter) in your sauce have an intriguing dissolving effect on one another. As a consequence, their tastes are released, and the sauce as a whole benefits from this release of flavors. Keep in mind that a splash of wine need additional time to allow the alcohol to completely boil off. It will leave behind all of the flavor but none of the crunch or bite. Start with a cup of red wine and reduce your infused sauce until approximately half of the wine has been reduced, resulting in a subtle, concentrated taste profile.

Acidity Balance

It’s also vital to choose the correct red wine to pair with your meal. Acidity in many tomato sauces may readily overpower low-acid wines such as Merlot, which has a low acidity. Sangiovese, on the other hand, is the wine that brings tomato sauce to its full potential. But don’t just grab the cheapest bottle you can find on the market. If it’s something you wouldn’t drink, don’t put it in your sauce! One more expert tip: when it comes to adding a little flavor and depth to tomato sauce, white wine may frequently be equally as effective as red wine in most cases.

We at La Famiglia are well aware of the impact that a generous splash of fine wine can make to a dish.

Cooking with Wine – How-To

I drink a lot of wine at home, both for enjoyment and because I work as a chef at Cakebread Cellars in California’s Napa Valley, where I am responsible for developing meals to pair with the wine. My refrigerator is frequently stocked with leftover wine: bottles that are too nice to throw away but are no longer suitable for drinking. Instead of allowing those stoppered bottles to rot away in the back of the refrigerator, I utilize them to prepare meals. When I don’t have any leftover wine on hand, I keep a few inexpensive but respectable bottles of wine in my cupboard for those occasions.

Some of my favorite methods to utilize wine in cooking are demonstrated in these recipes, which include enriching a pot of mussels with wine, making a pan sauce for seared steak, flavoring a slow-cooked onion jam, and soaking strawberries for a quick and simple dessert.

Wine is a delicious flavoring, but the alcohol needs taming

One of the most important reasons to cook with wine is to provide acidity to a meal, which in turn brings out the flavors of the other ingredients in the dish. However, because wine also includes alcohol, it is normally added at the beginning of the cooking process to give the alcohol a chance to burn off. It is common for dishes to have an unpleasant raw-wine flavor after wine has been splashed into them towards the conclusion of the cooking process. Furthermore, warm temperatures increase acidity and alcohol (if you’ve ever had a glass of wine that was served too warmly, you’ll understand what I’m talking about), making it even more difficult to properly utilize wine.

It opens up a plethora of new culinary possibilities when you understand how to handle wine and heat, as well as which wines perform best in specific dishes.

The first thing to understand about cooking with wine is that heat will not enhance the unpleasant characteristics of a terrible wine; rather, it will exacerbate these characteristics.

The opposite is true as well: heat destroys the delicate flavors and aromas found in complex wines, so keep that 1985 single-vineyard Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon for sipping.

Young wines with lively fruit notes add the best flavor

When you cook with wine, you’re concentrating the flavors of the wine while also evaporating the majority of its alcohol. (However, according to food scientist Shirley Corriher, even after 2-1/2 hours of simmering, some alcohol can still be found in the dish, despite the fact that the cooking time increases.) Red, white, or rosé wines that are still young and with vibrant fruit aromas are the ideal choices for this dish. Make use of dry white wines with a high acidity level. These are also referred to as “crisp” in the wine industry.

  1. Fuller whites with rich, oaky characteristics, such as certain Chardonnays, don’t work as well for cooking since they are too full-bodied.
  2. When oaky and buttery tastes are decreased, they become bitter and do not offer anything nice to a meal.
  3. It may be used to deglaze the pan after sautéing fish, chicken, pork, or mushrooms, or to make a pan sauce for them.
  4. Toss it in with a pot of seafood right before you cover it with a lid to steam it.
  5. Dry red wines with moderate tannins should be used.
  6. As with white wines, the acidity of the meal will bring out the tastes of the other ingredients.
  7. Be mindful that really full-bodied reds—big Cabernets, Syrahs, and Barolos—that include large amounts of tannins might leave a chalky flavor when the wine is diluted to a little amount.

Slow-cooking stews or tomato sauces benefit from the addition of red wine. Cooking with it in a skillet for seared lamb, duck, chicken, or beef is a great idea. In fact, red wine may be used to enhance the flavor of sweets; I’ll get to that in a minute.

When to add the wine

When to add the wine: To achieve the greatest taste and to ensure that all of the alcohol is cooked out, add it at the following times: When making stews, braises, or long-simmering tomato sauces, add the wine early in the simmering stage, after you’ve browned the meat and veggies and browned the onions. Allow the wine to decrease for a few minutes before adding the other liquids. When making a slow-simmering tomato ragù, some cooks add a little splash of red wine at the end of the cooking process to intensify the flavor, but only if the wine is of exceptional quality.

  • Reduce the wine until it has a syrupy consistency, scraping up any browned pieces at the bottom of the pan.
  • If you’d like, you may whisk in a tablespoon or two of butter.
  • Alternatively, the marinade can be used as the basis for a sauce.
  • If you are making a risotto, wait until the onions are cooked and after the rice has been added and lightly browned in the butter to add the wine.
  • Adding the wine after the initial searing but before the fish is cooked completely will give the wine time to decrease, which is ideal for shrimp or scallops.
See also:  How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Maker

Use raw wine, but prudently

Adding wine to a recipe typically necessitates boiling the wine down first. Having saying that, there are a few of notable outliers. Raw wine is best used in cold recipes, where the frost helps to attenuate the astringency of the alcohol. The recipe for Strawberries in Red Wine is successful because the meal is served cold and because the sugar and berry juices help to soften the wine while it is cooking. Of course, raw wines may be used in marinades as well, and the marinade can then be utilized as the foundation for a cooked sauce as described above.

Custard sauces, sorbets, and even fruit salads can be enhanced with a splash of Sauternes, late-harvest Riesling, or other sweet wine, depending on the recipe.

Last but not least, avoid the “cooking wine” that you’ll find on shop shelves.

Think of all the delicious leftovers you’ll have, even if you just use a quarter of a fine wine bottle.

When to add wine to tomato sauce (Italian)? (ingredients, chicken, sugar) – Recipes

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Location: Kansas City, MO3,565 posts, read7,227,523timesReputation: 2594
When I make a basic red wine pan sauce for filet mignon, I always brown the shallots and garlic and then “deglaze” the pan with the wine and shortly after put in beef stock. However, the marinara/pomodoro sauce recipes I’ve been looking at, some have you “deglaze” the pan with the wine before adding the tomatoes and others have you add the wine half way through your simmer time or toward the end. So my question is, which way is best and what difference does it make?If you’re curious, I’m going to make chicken parmesan, but this time add the dimension of red wine to the sauce, which for me is San Marzano tomatoes, shallots, garlic, fresh basil and oregano, salt and pepper, and possibly bay leaf.Thanks,MOKAN
Location: Islip,NY19,383 posts, read24,462,169timesReputation: 21498
When I make a marinara sauce I add the wine in the beginning after I add the tomatoes because I let the sauce cook low and slow all day, about 5-6 hours. I add about 1/2 cup red wine. I also make about 6 qts of sauce, in other recipes I add wine to deglaze the pan and sometimes the recipe calls for the wine to be reduced.
25,626 posts, read33,721,473timesReputation: 23192
I usually deglaze the skillet with beef stock after sauteing the aromatics for my Sunday gravy. I add the wine when I add the tomatoes. I will also taste at the end of the cooking process and add a splash or two if I want to pump up the flavor. I also make versions with vodka and sweet vermouth.
Location: Kansas City, MO3,565 posts, read7,227,523timesReputation: 2594
Quote:Originally Posted byBulldogdadI usually deglaze the skillet with beef stock after sauteing the aromatics for my Sunday gravy. I add the wine when I add the tomatoes. I will also taste at the end of the cooking process and add a splash or two if I want to pump up the flavor. I also make versions with vodka and sweet vermouth.That’s interesting. I thought you had to use an acid (wine or vinegar) to deglaze.lubby- what you had to say is also interesting, but I’m afraid adding the wine at first will cause it to all cookout and I’m leaning toward adding it halfway through my simmer or after. If the sauce gets too thick, the wine will fix that.On a side note, I was reading links on a Google search and apparently “pomodoro” sauce is a very quick, very simple tomato sauce that is bright and fresh, whereas “marinara” is a long simmer resulting in a richer, zestier sauce.
25,626 posts, read33,721,473timesReputation: 23192
You could deglaze with water if you wanted. all deglazing does is remove the caramelized sugars and proteins from the bottom of the pan so it lends its flavor to your end product.The wine flavor from the grape wont cook out just the alcohol. that’s why I add a couple of splashes at the end to brighten the flavor. The longer you cook down wine the more complex and concentrated the flavor becomes.
Location: Islip,NY19,383 posts, read24,462,169timesReputation: 21498
I add the wine for flavor not for the alcohol content in it.
Location: Kansas City, MO3,565 posts, read7,227,523timesReputation: 2594
Quote:Originally Posted bylubbyI add the wine for flavor not for the alcohol content in it.The alcohol always quickly evaporates. When you deglaze a pan, it’s like an explosion to your senses. And I have yet to do it, but when making a brandy or whiskey sauce it flames (as seen on TV).
Beginning, middleend. as needed.As much as the ingredients needs a “wetting”, I am prone to use wine instead of water (for wine dishes) when ever the ingredients gets too dry.
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Red Wine Basil Pasta Sauce

This wonderful red wine basil pasta sauce is enhanced by the addition of wine, which imparts additional depth of flavor and complexity. Does it seem like I’m the only one who remembers the days when you could make a last-minute rush to Blockbuster to pick up a movie? Remember when you could just grab a dozen odd movies and go on a movie binge that was essentially spur of the moment? Not to be misunderstood, I have a Netflix subscription and am just as addicted to “on demand” programming as the rest of you.

  1. I mean, who am I kidding?
  2. Don’t you think so?
  3. There is absolutely nothing.
  4. However, I would want to express my regret for not uploading this delicious pasta sauce when I first prepared it some weeks ago.
  5. And you already know how much I like spaghetti sauce in particular.
  6. As a result, I occasionally find myself looking at a half-finished bottle of red wine that I had left over.
  7. I, of course, caved in, and the outcome was spectacular!
  8. Deliciously thick and creamy sauce that is brimming with the taste of fresh Italian herbs!

You don’t do it as well, do you?). Overall, whatever you decide to do with it, I am confident that it will be fantastic! Moreover, does it not appear harsh and odd that Sex And The City is not available on Netflix Instant? Print

Description

This wonderful red pasta sauce is enhanced by the addition of red wine, which imparts additional depth of flavor and complexity.

  • 4 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 12 cup dry red wine (I used a moderately priced Cabernet Sauvignon)
  • 3 cups finely chopped onion
  • 4 tablespoons minced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil There are 228 ounce cans of San Marzano tomatoes, 26 ounce cans of tomato paste, and 2 cupschen stock. One of my favorite chicken stock recipes calls for 14 cups plus 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh basil, 3 teaspoons fresh thyme, 3 large pinches of Kosher salt, 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, 2 teaspoons dried oregano, and 1 teaspoon dried sage.
  1. To prepare the Dutch oven, heat it over medium heat until it is hot (5 12 to 7 quarts). Swirl in the olive oil to coat the pan. Saute the onions and garlic until the onions are translucent and the garlic is fragrant. You don’t want them to become brown
  2. Cook for about 2 minutes, stirring constantly with a flat wooden spatula, until the red wine has somewhat decreased in volume. Stir occasionally while bringing the sauce to a slow boil, then lowering the heat to a low setting and simmering it for 4 to 8 hours, covered. If the sauce becomes too thick, you may thin it up with more chicken stock. In order to have a thicker sauce, I let mine to reduce for the final hour with the lid removed. When the sauce has been simmering for approximately 2 hours, I like to test it to make sure it doesn’t require any further spice. Towards the conclusion of your cooking time, take another taste of the sauce to determine whether it is excessively tart. It is possible to add 1 tablespoon granulated sugar to counteract the acid in the dish if it is too acidic for your taste. I’ve discovered that it varies significantly from batch to batch.

Notes

My pasta sauces are thick, but if you don’t like them that way, simply add extra chicken stock to your preference and skip the stage when I remove the cover to let the sauce to simmer down. I believe that richer sauces are preferable for lasagna. American Heritage Cooking provided the recipe. Red wine, pasta sauce, Italian herbs, and pasta are some of the ingredients.

The Perfect Marinara Sauce With Wine

FoodWineAndLove.com has provided this recipe for The Perfect Marinara Sauce with Wine, which has been altered for this site. My new blog, FoodWineandLove, is inspired by the Mediterranean Diet.

The Perfect Marinara Sauce With Wine

The answer is yes, you may include wine in your Marinara Sauce. It is, in my opinion, the wine that elevates this sauce to a higher level of excellence. In order for this dish to be a success, only a modest amount of wine is required. And, of course, there’s the possibility of some delectable pasta to accompany it. There is something about the wine that imparts such a wonderful flavor to this dish. Marinara sauce, as you may already be aware, is a sauce that is rather simple to prepare. Although the components in this sauce are excellent, the combination of them makes it a fantastic dish.

Marinara Sauce is really about the most simple in ingredients tomato sauce that you can make.

A marinara sauce is made out of a small number of components that are frequently combined together. This is in contrast to a traditional tomato or pasta sauce, which may have a more extensive list of components as well as a more complicated cooking technique to follow. In a marinara sauce, the components are as straightforward as they come, and they are the ones you would expect to find in a sauce of this nature. Marinara sauce, on the other hand, is a swiftly prepared sauce that does not require the sauce to be simmered on the stove for hours.

Consider the wine that we add to the mix as a toast to the success of the marriage of the various elements.

You may be wondering what kind of wine to use in a recipe such as this one.

That is one of the things that makes a marinara sauce so delicious. In fact, most wines would be excellent choices for this cuisine. For the most part, both red and white wines should be excellent choices for this meal. By “for the most part,” I mean that you should avoid fortified or port wines since they may be a little too strong for this dish. A fine red wine, on the other hand, should enhance the richness of the flavor as well as the overall balance of the components in this dish. A white wine, on the other hand, would undoubtedly offer that wonderful fruit flavor that would send the taste receptors in a completely other path.

Finding the perfect wine to add to this recipe should not be a hard task.

I would really consider starting with any leftover wine that you may have sitting in your refrigerator at the moment. Nonetheless, if you’re looking for a red wine, a Cabernet or Chianti would be excellent options to consider. A Pinot Grigio or a Sauvignon Blanc are both excellent alternatives when it comes to white wines.

The wine that you use in this recipe may also be suitable for use in the wine that you serve with your dinner. In any case, you may just add the wine to the sauce and then pour it into a separate dish to serve yourself. As a result, you have a fantastic wine-influenced supper on your hands.

Getting back to the Marinara Sauce itself.

In fact, the word “marinara” comes from the word “mariner,” since the dish may be traced back to sailors who were the first to taste it, or so the story goes. However, you should be aware that this is a sauce that has a strong American influence, as those mariners were the people who traveled between Italy and the New World, which is now known as the United States. Also known as the “vegetarian tomato sauce,” Marinara Sauce is the most popular of the tomato sauces. I’m referring to the fact that, unlike other pasta sauces that we like eating, this particular sauce does not include any animal products.

I mentioned that this is a pasta sauce however, there are other great uses for a Marinara Sauce.

It is impossible to overstate how delicious a handmade pizza with marinara sauce tastes unless you have experienced it firsthand. In addition, this sauce is excellent as a dipping sauce for cheese sticks (think about it). Here are other recipes that are similar to this one that you might also enjoy.

  • How to Make the Perfect Vodka Sauce
  • Low-Carb Penne Pasta Bake
  • Low-Carb Cauliflower Casserole
  • How to Make the Perfect Vodka Sauce

Keep up to date with my recipes

Amazon has my guide on baking using sugar substitutes, which you can read about here. I have some excellent suggestions for substitutions that may be suitable in a recipe such as this one. Please be sure to follow me on Facebook as well as subscribe to my recipes through email in order to stay up to date. The Optimal Marinara Sauce Made with Red Wine

The recipe for The Perfect Mariana with Wine Sauce

As previously said, this is a straightforward sauce with a straightforward list of components. It goes without saying that wine will be used in this recipe. I also noted that both red and white wine should be suitable for use in this recipe, which is correct. I would avoid using fortified or port wines in this dish since they may be a little too much for the palate. A Cabernet or a Chianti would be appropriate choices for a red wine. A Pinot Grigio or a Sauvignon Blanc are both excellent alternatives when it comes to white wines.

How To Make The Perfect Marinara Sauce With Wine- what you need to make this.

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 yellow or sweet onion, diced
  • 2 cloves chopped garlic
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil a 28-ounce can of tomatoes, crushed or chopped, depending on your desire
  • 12 cup of wine (see above for more choices)
  • Seasonings such as salt, pepper, basil, and other herbs are added to taste. Seasonings are basically a matter of personal choice, as well as the other components that you choose to use in your sauce. Most crucially, the wine that you choose to serve with it.

How To Make The Perfect Marinara Sauce With Wine.

  • Cook the onion until it is soft in a large saucepan over medium heat until it is tender. It should just take a few minutes to complete this task. Then add the garlic and simmer until the garlic is tender, about 5 minutes. Turn the heat up to medium and pour in the wine into the skillet. This should take no more than a minute or two. Stirring the mixture often will help to keep the ingredients from burning and sticking to the pan. When this stage is completed, the wine should have almost evaporated from the skillet. Add the other ingredients to the skillet and reduce the heat to low, allowing the sauce to simmer. As well as stirring occasionally, your sauce should be finished in 15- 20 minutes, giving you plenty time to prepare your pasta:).

The Recipe Card for The Perfect Marinara Sauce With Wine

Serve your next delicious pasta dish with this simple recipe for The Perfect Marinara Sauce with Wine to elevate it to a whole new level. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking Time: 20 minutes Time allotted: 35 minutes Course:dinner American and Italian cuisines are available. Marinara, pasta, sauce, and wine were among the terms that came up in the search. Servings:8

  • Cook the onion in the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat until it is soft. It should just take a few minutes to complete this task. Then add the garlic and simmer until the garlic is tender, about 5 minutes. This should just take a minute or two
  • Nonetheless, it is recommended. After that, increase the heat up a notch and pour in the wine into the pan. Stirring the mixture often will help to keep the ingredients from burning and sticking to the pan. When this phase is completed, the majority of the wine should have been burned off. Reduce the heat to low and let the sauce to simmer for a few minutes after adding the additional ingredients to the skillet. Stir your sauce on a regular basis as well. In 15 to 20 minutes, the sauce should be finished, allowing you plenty chance for pasta preparation.

For further information, please visit the post. I also noted that both red and white wine should be suitable for use in this recipe, which is correct. I would avoid using fortified or port wines in this dish since they may be a little too much for the palate. A Cabernet or a Chianti would be appropriate choices for a red wine. A Pinot Grigio or a Sauvignon Blanc are both excellent alternatives when it comes to white wines.

*As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. This means that the links on this website, and specifically on this post, that lead to other sites may be affiliate links.

The following are the nutritional values: calories: 67kcal|carbohydrates: 5g|protein: 1g|fat: 3g|sodium: 6mg|potassium: 270mg|fiber: 1g|sugar: 3g|vitamin A: 825IU|vitamin C: 14.9mg|calcium: 14mg|iron: 0.4mg

Please note: Nutritional data has been calculated using a tool that comes with this recipe card and not by me.This means thatNutritional Information is only an estimate and can vary especially with ingredients that you use. The accuracy of this tool may differ from other tools as expected. Also note that there is no instructional value to the video that may be attached to this recipe. It is only there for visual pleasure. For more information about the images in this recipe, please refer the the recipe instructions. Thank you!

If you decide to try this recipe, please come back here and let me know how it came out for you. Thank you. Please share any other advice or modifications to the recipe that you may have in the comments area below as well. My readers like stopping by on a regular basis to see what new recipes have been added. Reading the comments below is beneficial to these readers, and maybe it is also beneficial to you as well! Are you looking for a recipe that isn’t already on my site?

In that case, please notify me and I will look into obtaining the recipe for you. Best wishes for baking, eating, and living life to the fullest! Click here to see the things that have been featured on mySugar Free Sunday Spotlight in the previous week.

Restaurant Style Spaghetti Sauce

Hello, my name is Corrie and I’m the one who uploaded the recipe. There are just a few minor corrections. It is preferable to use ground Italian sausage in this recipe rather than sliced. It’s also important to use canned Italian-style tomatoes, and to crush them between your fingers while you’re adding them into the sauce. We wish you a delicious meal!

Most helpful critical review

After reading the evaluations, I’m left wondering if individuals are aware of exactly how much their ingredient choices influence the outcome of their dish. If you start with Del Monte whole tomatoes and then switch to another brand later, the sauce will taste different. And then there’s the suasage. Wow, talk about a range of options. Half of the excitement of preparing a delicious meal is scouring your local markets for the best sausage that YOU will like. Seek advice from others, such as your grandmother, on which butcher understands how to prepare sausage and which brand she prefers.

  1. What you get at the meat counter at the grocery store is ridiculous.
  2. Alternatively, get some great lean pork butt and grind it up according to a recipe found on the internet.
  3. It is not necessary to have perfectly good pig encased in a casing in order to call it sausage.
  4. Is it a natural occurrence?
  5. And then there’s the wine.
  6. You’re going to eat it, so find one that suits you.
  7. Make certain that the recipe matches the brand of product, the time of year it was purchased, or whatever else you may need to prepare the sauce for company.
  8. I’m sure you get the picture.
  • 5 star ratings: 27
  • 4 star ratings: 8
  • 3star values are 4, 2star values are 1, and 1star values are 2.

Hello, my name is Corrie and I’m the one who uploaded the recipe. There are just a few minor corrections. It is preferable to use ground Italian sausage in this recipe rather than sliced. It’s also important to use canned Italian-style tomatoes, and to crush them between your fingers while you’re adding them into the sauce. We wish you a delicious meal! Outstanding!

  • We strive to follow to the recipe as closely as feasible when possible, but due to the availability of some components, we had to make one or two slight adjustments.
  • After that, we added 2 tablespoons of olive oil before adding the onions and 8 garlic cloves.
  • When cooked in cast iron, foods with a high acidity, such as tomatoes, have a taste that we do not enjoy.
  • In comparison to the original, I made some significant revisions.
  • I didn’t include the wine because I didn’t have any on hand.
  • as well as 4 garlic cloves (I love garlic).
  • It was far superior to the jar variety.

This is the only way that my husband and I will eat spaghetti from here on out!

It’s wonderful and savory even without any modifications!

It has quickly become my favorite recipe.

After browning everything, I cooked it all in a slow cooker on low for the entire day (8-9hrs).

Thank you for sharing the recipe.

In my perspective, there isn’t enough flavor for the amount of time it takes (simmering time to cook sausages that is not effort – admittedly the recipe is easy).

You might also experiment with various spices or fresh vegetables, such as adding some fresh tomatoes in addition to the crushed tomatoes from a can.

I followed the instructions to the letter and let it simmer for approximately an hour on a low heat setting.

If you start with Del Monte whole tomatoes and then switch to another brand later, the sauce will taste different.

Wow, talk about a range of options.

Seek advice from others, such as your grandmother, on which butcher understands how to prepare sausage and which brand she prefers.

What you get at the meat counter at the grocery store is ridiculous.

Alternatively, get some great lean pork butt and grind it up according to a recipe found on the internet.

It is not necessary to have perfectly good pig encased in a casing in order to call it sausage.

Is it a natural occurrence?

And then there’s the wine.

You’re going to eat it, so find one that suits you.

Make certain that the recipe matches the brand of product, the time of year it was purchased, or whatever else you may need to prepare the sauce for company.

I’m sure you get the picture.

However, I will use less merlot in the future because it was pretty overbearing this time around.

Weeknight Red Wine Pasta Sauce

Homemade pasta sauce is simple to prepare and is well worth the effort when you create this intensely flavored nightly red wine spaghetti sauce with roasted vegetables. In addition, it freezes and cans nicely, and is a great addition to any pasta recipe. Red wine spaghetti sauce is presently the go-to weekday dish because, after all, what is the one thing that every weeknight requires? The answer is a glass of wine. Spoiler alert: once you’ve finished creating this spaghetti sauce, you’ll have around a half bottle of wine left over, which you’ll need to finish off as soon as possible.

This red wine pasta sauce is one of our favorite red sauces for several reasons

  • Homemade pasta sauce is simple to prepare and is well worth the effort when you create this very flavored nightly red wine spaghetti sauce with roasted vegetables! In addition, it freezes and cans nicely, making it a great addition to any pasta recipe. This week’s go-to dish for weeknights is red wine pasta sauce because, after all, what is the one thing that every weeknight requires the most? Yes, wine is the solution. Forewarning: once you’ve finished creating this spaghetti sauce, you’ll have around a half bottle of wine left over, which you’ll need to finish off right away! Better than pasta and a glass of wine on a weeknight?

Cooking the Sauce

The aromatics are sauteed first, followed by the meat. A whopping 6 cloves of garlic, a dash of red pepper flakes, and tomato paste are tossed together in olive oil for a fast sauté. The red wine is then added to the pan, and we’ll let it simmer for approximately 10 minutes, or until it’s reduced by half, before serving. From there, it’s just a matter of putting together the remainder of the sauce! 2 cans of peeled tomatoes (28 oz each), a few basil leaves, and a sprig of rosemary are added to the pan and cooked until the tomatoes are soft.

Once the tomatoes have been entirely broken down and the sauce has been reduced and thickened, the sauce is finished.

Pureeing the Sauce

Pour the sauce into a blender and purée until smooth, using either a handheld immersion blender or a high-speed blender. If you want a chunkier sauce, I recommend using an immersion blender, which allows you to have greater control over the pureeing process while making the sauce. A little additional basil at the end is nice for a little extra herby kick, but other than that, we’re finished! Guys, making pasta sauce at home is absolutely the simplest thing you can do. This recipe is perfect for a weekday dinner, and I highly recommend preparing a double batch for long-term storage.

Plus, there’s wine in the sauce and in your glass, so tell me what’s wrong with that.

  • Shiitake Mushroom Beef Stroganoff in the Instant Pot
  • Hawaiian Oven Baked BBQ Chicken Tenders
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  • And many more.

Weeknight Red Wine Pasta Sauce

Homemade pasta sauce is simple to prepare and is well worth the effort when you create this intensely flavored nightly red wine spaghetti sauce with roasted vegetables. In addition, it freezes and cans nicely, and is a great addition to any pasta recipe. Preparation time: 5 minutes Cooking Time: 1 hour and 30 minutes Time allotted: 1 hour and 35 minutes 1 quart of sauce (serves 4) Calories94kcal

  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed, 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes, 2 tablespoons tomato paste, 1 cup dry red wine, 2 (28 oz each) cans whole peeled tomatoes, 4-6 fresh basil leaves plus extra for garnishing, 1 sprig rosemary, salt and pepper to taste, 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • 2 (28 oz each) cans whole peeled tomatoes
  • 4-6 fresh basil leaves plus extra for garnishing
  • 1 sprig rosemary
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Sauce can be kept refrigerated for up to 6 days, frozen for up to 3 months, or canned according to conventional canning processes (see below).

A serving contains: 4 oz sauce|94 kcal|6.7 g carbohydrates|1.6 g protein|5.2 g fat|1.9g saturated fat|6 g cholesterol|45 mg sodium|66 mg potassium|0.2g fiber|5.4 g sugar|7 mg calcium|1 mg iron

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Taking a glance at the ingredients written on the jars of spaghetti sauce in your kitchen cabinet, it is probable that red wine will appear more frequently than not on the list of components. With only a modest bit of the perfect red wine, an ordinary Italian meal may be transformed into something truly remarkable in no time. Several key chemicals found in red wine enhance the flavor of sauces and other cooked meals by a factor of several orders of magnitude. The Function of Alcohol in a Flavorful Sauce The alcohol in wine causes the release of flavor molecules into the sauce, which enhances the flavor of every item it comes into touch with.

  • A comparable dissolving and subsequent taste release is not triggered by other liquids and fats, such as broth, water, olive oil, and butter, among others.
  • The top chefs in the business cook wine-infused sauces to the point where half of the wine is cooked away during the cooking process.
  • Acidity in Red Wine Inquire about the experience with a red wine such as Merlot and a dish that includes red tomato sauce, and you will learn that the tomatoes burn directly through to the wine, leaving it with a bland flavor.
  • This is precisely why very excellent chefs choose wines such as Chianti Classico when preparing meals that include tomato sauce as an ingredient.
  • Test the food with your senses.
  • Prepare two distinct pasta meals with the help of a family member or friend: one with a red wine-infused sauce and the other with a basic sauce.
  • The robust flavor of red wine is truly the x-factor in the creation of the world’s greatest tomato sauces.
  • When it comes to the use of red wine in tomato sauce, our cooks follow the following rule: “If we won’t drink it, we won’t eat it,” they say.

This implies that there will be no table wine, no wine from a box, and no other inferior wine in our tomato sauce at all. Our tomato sauce is made with only the best quality, most palate-pleasing red wine available, ensuring that your taste buds are satisfied.

Red Wine Pasta Sauce

You will very certainly discover red wine in greater quantities than you would expect on the ingredient list on the jars of pasta sauce in your kitchen cabinet. With the correct red wine, even a modest bit of an ordinary Italian meal may be transformed into something outstanding. Several key chemicals found in red wine enhance the taste of sauces and other prepared meals by a factor of several hundred. Aromatic Sauces: What Is the Function of Alcohol? Alcohol in wine causes flavor molecules to be released into sauce, enhancing the flavor of every ingredient that comes into touch with it.

  1. A comparable dissolving and subsequent taste release is not triggered by other liquids and fats, such as broth, water, olive oil, and butter As long as the alcohol is allowed to simmer off completely, it will actually improve the flavor of the sauce.
  2. The flavor of the sauce becomes concentrated once the alcohol has burned down to this level, resulting in a mouthwatering flavor.
  3. Reduced-acid red wines, such as Merlot, are overshadowed by the highly-acidic tomato sauce that is used in many pasta dishes, pizzas, and other foods.
  4. Tomato sauce pairs excellently with Chianti’s signature grape, the sangiovese, since it has the exact amount of acidity required to create a harmonious pairing.
  5. A blind tasting test will help you decide if red wine should be used in tomato sauce if you’re still unsure.
  6. After trying each dish, you’ll most likely discover that the pasta, pizza, or other dishes that have been covered with red wine sauce taste better.
  7. When it comes to genuinely delicious tomato sauce, though, any old red wine will not do.
  8. Using only the highest-quality, most palate-pleasing red wine, we ensure that our tomato sauce will satisfy even the most discriminating palette.

Red wine sauce ingredients

  • Extra virgin olive oil — Choose a high-quality extra virgin olive oil, such as California Olive Ranch, for this recipe. Dry red wine — For this dish, you may use any dry red wine that you choose. No, you do not need to purchase a $40 dollar bottle of wine in order to prepare this sauce
  • Instead, I have selected some less costly wines that are rich and powerful in taste and are ideal for this purpose
  • Onion and garlic – Finely chop the onion and garlic until they are a paste. Pro tip: chopping the mixture in a food processor will save you time, energy, and tears in the long run. For all of my sauce recipes, I always use Cento crushed tomatoes, which is my all-time favorite brand for this purpose. A fantastic brand with a fantastic texture and flavor, it is a high-quality product. The use of fresh herbs in Italian cooking is popular. Oregano and basil are two of the most commonly used herbs. The flavor of the tomato is enhanced by the use of these herbs. Pasta — For this dish, you may use whatever type of pasta you choose

Chef’s tips

Choose an extra virgin olive oil of high quality, such as California Olive Ranch, to use in your recipe. Drink dry red wine for this dish; you can use any of your favorite brands. To prepare this sauce, you don’t need to spend $40 on a bottle of wine; I’ve chosen some less costly wines that are rich and robust in taste and are ideal for this purpose. onion and garlic – coarsely chop the onion and garlic before adding them to the pan. Pro tip: chopping the mixture in a food processor will save you time, energy, and tears in the long run; For all of my sauce recipes, I always use Cento crushed tomatoes because they are my absolute favorite brand.

The use of fresh herbs is prevalent in Italian cooking; oregano and basil are two of the most common.

  • Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Chianti, and Zinfandel are some of the most popular red wines.

Cut the acidity

To reduce the acidity of this pasta sauce, add 1 teaspoon of sugar, honey, or baking soda to the sauce. Although you won’t be able to detect the presence of these components, they will make this sauce a bit gentler on sensitive stomachs.

Save the pasta water

Here’s a trick that I’ve used over and over again: add pasta water to your sauce! In addition to adding a layer of flavor, the carby water is quite delectable! Before serving, stir in 1/2 to 1 cup of salted pasta water to thin down the sauce. Add the pasta water, I promise you!

Make it your own

This sauce is quite excellent, but as you know, I enjoy providing you with suggestions for how to take these recipes to the next level and customize them to your preferences. Here are some of my tried-and-true modifications that truly elevate this sauce to a higher level of excellence.

  • Hot Italian sausage –If you want to use Italian sausage, heat it in the same pot that you will be using to prepare your sauce until it is hot. Once the sausage is done, remove it from the pan and sautè the onion, garlic, and fresh herbs in the fat until they are soft and fragrant. After you’ve added the wine and crushed tomatoes, return the sausage to the saucepan and reduce the heat to a simmer. It’s very delicious. A few of tablespoons of chicken broth can give your sauce an additional rich and wonderful taste without taking up much space in the pan. This is my go-to technique for bringing all of the savory tastes of the sauce together in one dish
  • Roasted garlic — You may substitute roasted garlic for raw garlic if you like a stronger, more complex flavor. Pasta water – Always include pasta water in your sauce when cooking pasta. Always. Please remember to thank me afterwards.

How to make red wine pasta sauce

  1. Sauté the onion, garlic, and herbs until translucent. Place a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat and bring it to a boil. When the saucepan is heated, add the olive oil and mix well. Combine the minced garlic, onion, entire basil leaves, and oregano in a large mixing bowl. Sauté the mixture for 2 minutes, then add the wine and reduce it by half. Pour the red wine into the saucepan and let it to boil and decrease by half for 3-5 minutes
  2. Then, add the smashed tomatoes and stir well to combine. Pour the smashed tomatoes into the saucepan and decrease the heat to a low heat to simmer the sauce. Allow the sauce to simmer for at least 20 minutes, and then add the pasta water to finish it off. In a small bowl, combine 1/2-1 cup salted pasta water with the sauce and whisk until smooth. Serve over your favorite pasta. Mangia

How to make a large batch of red wine pasta sauce

If you want to prepare huge amounts of sauce so that you can store it in the freezer, I’ve got something for you! What you’ll need is the following:

  • All of the components in the list
  • 1 15-ounce can tomato sauce (not pasta sauce)
  • 1 6-ounce container tomato paste
  • 1 15-ounce can tomato sauce (not pasta sauce)

In the same manner as before, follow the instructions. Toss in the tomato sauce and paste at the same time as you add the crushed tomatoes to the saucepan. Cook the sauce until it thickens, then add the pasta water and simmer until it is ready to serve or freeze for later!

How to store and reheat red wine pasta sauce

Place the pasta sauce in an airtight jar in the refrigerator and use it within 5 days after making it. Because this is a red sauce, it has the potential to stain plastic storage containers, so I recommend storing it in a glass jar.

In the freezer

Place the sauce in the refrigerator until it has cooled completely. Fill separate airtight containers with the pasta sauce and set them in the freezer after the sauce has cooled to room temperature. You will avoid having any bursting glass bottles in your freezer by allowing the sauce to cool before putting it in the refrigerator.

To reheat

This sauce may be reheated in the microwave or on the stovetop, as desired. In a microwave-safe dish, cook the sauce on high for 1-2 minutes, or until it is well heated. Alternatively, you may reheat the sauce on the stovetop by placing it in a saucepan over medium heat and cooking it for 5 minutes, or until it is hot.

What to serve with red wine pasta sauce

  • Italian veggies are covered in a wonderful sauce that comes together in just a few minutes, making it a quick and easy side dish to prepare. Green bean bundles wrapped in prosciutto and coated in fresh rosemary and grated parmesan cheese make a delightful side dish that is sure to please a large group of people. Oven roasted asparagus is a simple side dish that is nutritious, tasty, and takes little time to prepare
  • Artichoke halves roasted with white wine and lemon have an intense taste and are high in nutritional value. The artichokes are juicy and tasty, thanks to the complementing undertones of white wine and lemon, as well as the lemon zest. Crispy oven-baked eggplant cutlets are a delicious Italian side dish that is sure to please. Freshly sliced eggplant is covered with a breadcrumb and parmesan cheese mixture and baked until crisp and golden brown

More Sea Salt Savorings classics

This hearty red wine pasta sauce is packed with rich flavors, making it a complete dinner in and of itself! This easy-to-make sauce with only three ingredients will have you swearing off canned food for good! This sauce is made with crushed tomatoes, Italian herbs, and a splash of red wine, and it is really delicious! Preparation time: 5 minutes Cooking Time: 30 min. Time allotted: 35 minutes Servings8Calories277kcal

  • 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 onionfinely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1/4 cup fresh basilwhole leaves left on stem, or 1 tbsp dried basil
  • 1tspfresh oreganoor 1/2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1/2 cup dry red wine
  • 128 oz can of crushed tomatoes
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/2 cup pasta water, 1 pound pasta
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  1. Sauté the onion, garlic, and herbs until translucent. Place a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat and bring it to a boil. When the saucepan is heated, add the olive oil and mix well. Combine the onion, garlic, basil leaves (leave them whole), and oregano in a large mixing bowl. Sauté the mixture for 1-2 minutes, then add the wine and reduce it by half. In a small saucepan, heat the red wine over medium heat until it has reduced by half, about 3-5 minutes. Simmer for a few minutes after adding the smashed tomatoes. Pour the smashed tomatoes and red pepper flakes into the saucepan and stir to combine the flavors. Stir the mixture until it comes to a gentle simmer. Toss in the sugar. Allow for at least 20 minutes of simmering time in the sauce. Prepare the pasta. Preparation: Bring a big saucepan of generously salted water (about 1 tablespoon of salt) to a rolling boil. Cook the pasta until it is al dente, following the directions on the package. 1 cup of the pasta water should be saved
  2. Add the pasta water. 1/2 cup of the pasta water should be added to the sauce. Add up to 1 cup at a time, stirring constantly, until desired consistency is obtained
  3. Serve. Toss the pasta in the red wine sauce, then top with your choice toppings, such as parmesan cheese or additional fresh basil, and serve. Mangia

Nutritional Values Pasta with a Red Wine Sauce Nutritional Information Per Serving Calories277Calories from Fat 54% of the Daily Value* 6g9 percent of calories come from fat, while 1g6 percent of calories come from saturated fat. Sodium6mg0 percent Sodium6mg0 percent 2g8 percent Potassium (142mg4 percent), Carbohydrates (45g15 percent), and Fiber 2g2 percent of sugar The protein content is 8g16 percent.

Vitamin A58IU1 percent (ascorbic acid) Nutritional Supplements: Vitamin C1mg1 percent Calcium22mg2 percent Iron1mg6 percent A 2000-calorie diet is used to calculate the percent Daily Values (%DV).

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