How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Maker

Here’s How to Make Homemade Pasta From Scratch, No Machine Needed

Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Making pasta from home has been a part of my life for almost eight years now, frequently with a child perched on each hip and without the aid of a pasta maker. When it comes to experimenting in the kitchen, gadgets may often be a hindrance. However, a tiny kitchen or a lack of financial resources should not impede anyone from creating delectable home-cooked meals. I’ve discovered that the majority of meals may be prepared with only a few simple instruments that can be used for various purposes.

Video: How to Make Homemade Pasta

Please also visit our Simply Kids CookYouTube series to see our Senior Editor Summer Miller prepare this meal with her children as part of our Simply Kids Cook YouTube series!

How to Make Homemade Pasta

A rolling pin is used to imitate the motion of a pasta maker while making pasta by hand: roll a tiny piece of dough out until it is paper thin, much like you would with a machine. Then, using a knife, cut it into individual noodles to make it more appealing. Even while it takes a bit more energy and time, it is possible to get the same thinness of the pasta as you would with a machine. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City.

Homemade Pasta on Your Schedule

Making pasta from scratch takes some time, but don’t let that deter you from trying your hand at it at home. You may make the pasta dough in one day and store it in the refrigerator overnight or in the freezer until you’re ready to cut and shape your spaghetti the next day. Refrigerating pasta dough for more than a day, on the other hand, is not recommended. The dough will darken if this is not done. If you don’t intend to cook your pasta the following day, you may freeze it.

  • Wrapping a ball of pasta dough in plastic wrap can help it to stay frozen longer. Then, place it into a zip-top bag and squeeze out all of the air from it (no need for oil). When you are ready to prepare the pasta the next morning, just transfer it from the freezer to your counter top. After you have rolled out and cut the noodles, they will be ready later that afternoon
  • You can also freeze the cut noodles. If I’m making handmade pasta, I usually make a large quantity and freeze the leftover noodles for those times when I need a little more carbohydrate. Even when cooked directly from the freezer, handmade noodles cook far more quickly than dry spaghetti from the supermarket, making them ideal for quick evening meals.

Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City.

Tips for Making Homemade Pasa

  • Don’t be alarmed if the eggs break through the flour while you’re mixing. Push some extra flour up against the break-through with your hand and continue to mix until the dough is smooth. A bench scraper is also quite handy in this situation since it allows you to sweep up a large amount of mess in a short amount of time. Keep it close at hand if you have one. It is critical to let the dough to rest before rolling it out: This allows the gluten in the dough to relax, making it simpler to roll out. When you roll out pasta by hand rather than using a machine, there is a significant difference in results. If your spaghetti becomes too sticky at any stage throughout the cooking process, add extra flour, a teaspoon at a time. Remember to sprinkle your countertop with flour at regular intervals as you’re rolling it out. In addition, it is critical to properly dust the rolled-out pasta with flour before folding or rolling the dough to cut it into the required form. If the dough begins to “snap back” as you roll it out, do the following: For 5 to 10 minutes, take a break and let it rest (to give the gluten a chance to relax). Then try rolling it once more
  • It should work this time. Preparing frozen noodles consists of the following steps: Without thawing, you may use frozen noodles directly out of the freezer. Don’t leave them out to defrost on the counter while you finish up the rest of your supper preparations. Condensation or ice crystals may occur within the bag from time to time. While they are thawing, this can cause your noodles to become soggy and clump together.

Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City.

What to Make With Homemade Pasta

With the same recipe and rolling method, you can easily produce thin linguini noodles, lasagna noodles, ravioli, tortellini, and any other type of pasta you can think of. Combine this pasta with your favorite sauce for a fast and simple weeknight supper, or add them to your favorite homemade chicken noodle soup recipe for a hearty and satisfying meal.

Sauces to Serve With Homemade Pasta

  • A basic tomato sauce, a Bolognese meat sauce, a make-ahead Alfredo sauce, fresh basil pesto, and mushroom sugo
  • A basic tomato sauce, a Bolognese meat sauce, a make-ahead Alfredo sauce

Quick Pasta: If you’re in a hurry, you may skip Step 4 and roll out the pasta directly once it is finished. After that, cut the meat into strips with a pizza cutter. You have the option of cutting lengthwise, crosswise, or even on the diagonal, depending on your preference. This results in a more rustic pasta meal that is yet tasty.

  • 2-and-a-half cups (350g)all-purpose flour, plus more flour for dusting and rolling
  • 1/4 cup salt and 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 4 big eggs and 1 egg yolk
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil and 1/2 teaspoon salt
  1. To make the dough, combine the following ingredients: Place the flour in a large mound on the kitchen counter. Using a huge hole or crater in the center, make a bowl-shaped well or crater large enough to house the eggs and olive oil. Fill the well with the eggs, yolks, olive oil, and salt, and set aside. Whisk the eggs and oil together with a fork until well combined. Continue whisking the eggs, but begin removing flour specks from the bottom of the well as you go. Make use of a steady, circular motion when stirring to avoid any eggs breaking through the bowl of flour. (Don’t be alarmed if the eggs break through the flour while you’re mixing. Continue mixing after pushing some extra flour up against the break-through with your hand or a bench scraper. Continue in this manner until the dough begins to come together and the eggs have been thoroughly integrated into the dough. In some areas, the dough will be moist and thick, while in others, it will be loose. Even after all of that, the mixture will still be fairly floury. That’s OK with me. Continue to knead the dough with your hands or a bench scraper until it comes together. To cut it into the remainder of the dough, I used my bench scraper to scoop up the wet and crumbled dough and fold it in half. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Make a ball of the dough and knead it for 10 minutes against the counter, according to Alison Conklin. When the dough is pretty cohesive but still little scraggly, shape it into a loaf and bake it for 30 minutes. The dough will be tough at first, but as you continue to knead it, it should begin to tighten and smooth out. If the dough begins to stick to your hands, sprinkle a little extra flour on the counter top before continuing. If the dough becomes too firm, a teaspoon of water can be added. More water or flour can be added a teaspoon at a time to get the desired texture. At the end of the process, you should have a soft, elastic dough that is not sticky and feels smooth to the touch, similar to a baby’s bottom. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Alison Conklin suggests wrapping the dough in plastic wrap and letting it sit on your counter for an hour before using it. Follow the instructions for the following stage after an hour, or refrigerate the dough for the next day (but not for more than 24 hours) or freeze the dough. When freezing pasta dough, cover it securely in plastic wrap to prevent it from expanding. After that, place it into a zip-top bag and push out as much air as possible. There is no need for oil.) Alison Conklin, “Roll out the pasta” (roll out the spaghetti) The dough should be shaped into a fat log and divided into 5 or 6 equal portions when it has completed resting. Leave one portion unwrapped and rewrap the remaining sections. (If you are working on a tiny counter, you may cut each piece in half again, which will result in less dough being used). Prepare your workstation by lightly flouring it and rolling out the dough into a long strip with your rolling pin. Lift the dough up with each pass of the rolling pin, re-dust the counter beneath it, and turn the dough over. Upon completion, you should have a long, thin piece of dough in your possession. It should be paper thin, yet robust enough to be lifted off the counter without squeaking. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Alison Conklin
  2. Fold the spaghetti strip in half like an accordion, loosely folding it: More flour should be sprinkled on the strip of dough. Starting with the short end, lightly fold the paper into an accordion shape to finish. (An accordion fold, such as the one seen below, is preferable to rolling the dough up like a cigar since it prevents the dough from clinging to itself better.) Alison Conklin is a writer and editor based in New York City. Alison Conklin
  3. Cut the stack into strips using the following method: Using a very sharp knife, cut the stack into thin strips across the folds of the paper. You may make the strips as thin or as thick as you like depending on your preference (like thin linguini or like wide fettuccine). However, make an effort to maintain consistency in the breadth. If this is not done, the noodles will cook at varying speeds. Alison Conklin, “Dry the Noodles” (Dry the Noodles) The noodles should be spread across your dining room table, kitchen island, or the back of a chair once they have been unrolled. Allow for approximately 15 minutes of drying time. Alison Conklin
  4. Repeat the process with the remaining dough: Continue to roll out and cut the remainder of the pasta until you’ve used up all of the remaining dough
  5. Use the noodles immediately or freeze them: The noodles will still be malleable, but they will be dry at this stage. They may either be consumed right away or frozen for later use. If you’re freezing the noodles, separate them into numerous little, loose bundles. Remember not to squeeze the noodles too much
  6. Simply gathering them together is sufficient. Place the noodle nests on a baking sheet that has been lightly dusted, and then freeze. Once frozen, move the nests to a big zipper bag and store in the freezer until you need them. The shelf life of frozen noodles is nine months. Preparation of the noodles: Alison Conklin Bring a large saucepan of well-seasoned water to a rolling boil. Cook the pasta for 4 to 5 minutes, or until it is chewy and al dente, depending on whether it is fresh or frozen (taste one of the noodles to check). Toss with your preferred sauce before serving. Alison Conklin
  7. Alison Conklin
Nutrition Facts(per serving)
226 Calories
6g Fat
34g Carbs
9g Protein

Display the Complete Nutrition Label Hide the entire nutrition label

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 8
Amount per serving
Calories 226
% Daily Value*
Total Fat6g 7%
Saturated Fat 1g 7%
Cholesterol139mg 46%
Sodium178mg 8%
Total Carbohydrate34g 12%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Total Sugars 0g
Protein9g
Vitamin C 0mg 0%
Calcium 27mg 2%
Iron 3mg 15%
Potassium 92mg 2%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

The nutritional information has been estimated using an ingredient database and should be regarded as an educated guess at best.

When there are numerous ingredient alternatives mentioned, the first one listed is used to compute the nutritional value. There are no garnishes or extra ingredients listed in this recipe.

How to Make Handmade Pasta—Without a Pasta Maker

We guarantee that it will be much simpler than you anticipate. Ciao! It is your Italian-American companion who is here to take you through the art of making handmade pasta. Wait, wait, and more wait! Please don’t leave just yet. It’s not nearly as difficult as you may assume. You shouldn’t be scared by the prospect of preparing your own pasta at home. If you have an hour or two to spare and a few pantry supplies on hand, you can whip up a meal of pasta that will transport you to a piazza table in Rome with just one mouthful.

You’re up to the challenge!

INGREDIENTS

Sign up for our daily email to have more excellent articles and delicious, nutritious recipes sent to your inbox. Photograph courtesy of Marie Silvio Ciranna Italian cuisine is suitable for all palates. Several individuals will discuss whether flour is the best and whether to use egg yolks or entire eggs in your recipe. Well, I’m here to inform you that any true Italian is going to choose their Nonna’s pasta over yours, so it really doesn’t matter what you think. The tastiest ingredients are always those that are already in your kitchen.

If you want my advice, I’d suggest using “00” flour since it produces the silkiest dough you’ve ever worked with.

Additionally, for a healthy pasta, you may try with a 50/50 substitution of whole-wheat flour.

MAKING YOUR DOUGH

Photograph courtesy of Marie Silvio Ciranna Pour the flour over your countertop, creating a mountain-like peak at the top with a peak at the top. Push down into the mountain peak toward the counter, using the tips of your fingers together, then move your fingers around in a circle until you have produced an 8-inch hole, ensuring sure you have a flour wall high enough to hold your eggs in. Fill the well with your eggs and, using a fork, scramble the eggs, gradually adding more and more flour to the eggs until a shaggy dough has formed.

  1. It’s time to put your fork aside and make use of the most precious instrument in your kitchen: your hands!
  2. If you find that the dough is becoming too hard, simply moisten your hands and begin kneading it again.
  3. Just remember not to give up—keep kneading!
  4. After that, take the dough out of the plastic wrap and cut it in half with a knife to make two balls.
  5. If the dough does not appear to be integrating itself properly, do not be concerned; simply moisten your hands and continue kneading.

As soon as both sides are smooth, cover them securely in plastic wrap and place them in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to firm up (up to 3 hours). You may now put your dough in the refrigerator overnight to prepare for tomorrow’s meal!

ROLLING OUT YOUR DOUGH

Photograph courtesy of Marie Silvio Ciranna Once your dough has had time to rest, it’s time to get your rolling machine ready. Flour the surface of your countertop and spread out the dough with a rolling pin until it is so thin that you could read a newspaper underneath it.

See also:  How Long Is Alfredo Pasta Good For In The Fridge

CUTTING YOUR DOUGH

Photograph courtesy of Marie Silvio Ciranna Take your thin strip of spaghetti and begin to roll it gently around itself, starting at one end of the sheet. If the dough is sticking to your hands, gently flour them before attempting to roll them. Once the pasta has been rolled, cut the pasta into noodles with a very sharp knife every 1/4th of an inch to create your noodles. Once the dough has been cut into parts, carefully unwind each portion one at a time. Voila! You’ve just finished preparing fresh spaghetti.

Photograph courtesy of Marie Silvio Ciranna

FREEZE, DRY, OR COOK

You have a variety of alternatives now that your pasta has been prepared. Place your noodles on a plastic-wrapped baking sheet and store them in the refrigerator for a few days, freeze them in batches for up to 4 months, or serve them right away! And, because we believe in the principle of “everything in moderation,” serve your handmade pasta with a glass of red wine and some of your favorite music, and let this simple, wonderful pasta to take your taste buds to the streets of Naples. Thank you for your time and consideration.

  1. No-Machine Pasta with a Fresh Twist (serves 4-6) Ingredients 3 1/4 cup “00” flour (also known as all-purpose flour) 5 eggs (whole) Step 1: Sift flour onto a clean work surface.
  2. Make sure you have a flour wall that is tall enough to keep your eggs contained.
  3. 3.
  4. 3.
  5. Work the dough for another 5-10 minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic.
  6. Set away for 15 minutes to allow your muscles to recover.
  7. Remove the dough from the wrapper and split the ball in two.
  8. Remove from the oven and put aside for 30 minutes to 3 hours.
  9. 5.
  10. It should be transparent enough that you can see your hand through it.
  11. Carefully roll the piece of dough up.

Drain and lay aside on a floured baking sheet until you’re ready to cook, refrigerate, or freeze your pasta dish. Cooking Fresh Pasta: Place the pasta in a pot of salted boiling water and cook for 1-2 minutes. While they are cooking, taste them to make sure they are done before draining them.

Homemade Pasta

Making two-ingredient spaghetti is a simple and quick meal to prepare at home. Everything from preparing pasta with or without a food processor or pasta machine to freezing pasta and changing out various flours is covered in this article. Pasta is scarce on the shelves at the moment, although certain varieties, flour, and, for the most part, eggs appear to be readily accessible in sufficient quantities. You don’t need anything else to create homemade pasta. It also happens to be really delectable pasta that tastes like a gourmet indulgence.

All you actually need is a rolling pin to get started.

It will expedite the process and relieve some of the burden.

Fresh Pasta Ingredients

Pasta flour, often known as 00’flour, is a high-protein flour that is widely used to make smoother, chewier pasta. For a somewhat rougher pasta that encourages the sauce to adhere to it more, semolina flour is a fantastic choice. Plain or all-purpose flour is in the middle of the spectrum. It produces pasta that is generally smooth with a mild chewiness. Because plain or all-purpose flour is the most common type of flour found in most people’s pantryes, I’m going to use it for this recipe. You can, however, substitute ’00’ flour or semolina flour for it like-for-like (in the same proportions).

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flour and eggs until well combined. Make use of the dough hook and begin mixing slowly until the mixture comes together as a ball of dough. Once the dough has formed a ball, raise the speed to medium and continue mixing for 5 minutes, or until the dough is smooth. Exit the basin and cover with clingfilm or wax paper to prevent the dough from drying out. Place the container in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and divide it into four equal pieces
  • Apply mild flour to a lightly floured surface and roll out the dough until it is as thin as it can be.
  • Prepare a little dusting of flour on top of the dough and roll it up loosely before slicing it into 12 cm (0.2″) thick slices. Separate the strands with your fingers and arrange them on a platter in parts

It is possible to cook the pasta straight immediately by dropping it into a big pot of boiling salted water for 3 minutes (see below for instructions for prepping ahead and storing). Because this pasta is so delicious, I like to serve it simply with a drizzle of excellent olive oil and a dusting of Maldon salt to complement it. A sprinkle of red pepper flakes gives it a nice little kick as well!

Can I make it ahead?

Yes, it is possible to prepare it ahead of time and preserve it in a variety of ways.

Fresh pasta – room temperature

Prepare the pasta and then spread it out on a dusted baking sheet/plate/tray, sprinkling it with more flour as needed. This is a good place to leave it for a couple of hours, unattended. If you want the pasta to be entirely dry, leave it for a longer period of time (see more info on drying pasta below). 3 minutes is all it takes to cook from room temperature.

Fresh pasta – refrigerated

If you wish to prepare the spaghetti a few days ahead of time, you may store it in the refrigerator. Make the pasta, then spread it out on a floured baking sheet/plate/tray and sprinkle it with flour. Allow it to dry for a couple of hours at room temperature before covering it and storing it in the refrigerator for up to 2-3 days. It takes 3 minutes to cook from refrigerated ingredients.

Drying homemade pasta

Prepare the pasta, then spread it out on a floured baking sheet/plate/tray and sprinkle it with flour to coat it completely. Dry the pasta for 24 hours, or until it snaps easily in your hands.

You should attempt to avoid putting the pasta in a humid area since it will not dry completely. Storage at room temperature for up to a month is possible once the product has been completely dried. Cooking time from dried ingredients is 4-7 minutes.

Freezing homemade pasta

Prepare the pasta and then spread it out on a dusted baking sheet/plate/tray, sprinkling it with more flour as needed. If you have the option, sprinkle the pasta with semolina flour before cooking it. This will assist to prevent the pasta from sticking together during cooking. If you don’t have any, you may use standard plain/all-purpose flour, which would work just as well. Cooking time from frozen is around 3-5 minutes. Tips: If possible, open freeze the pasta on a baking sheet for 30 minutes (when it’s still a little malleable) before using.

Freeze for a maximum of three months.

Watch how to make it

  • Making two-ingredient spaghetti is a simple and quick meal to prepare at home. I’m going to share all of my secrets, including how to freeze pasta and how to substitute different flours. Preparation time: 20 minutes 30 minutes of resting time Time allotted: 50 minutes Dinner and lunch are included in the price. CuisineItalianServings6Calories288kcal
  • 3 14 cups 420 grams plain (all-purpose) flour (see Note 1 for substitutions)
  • A dozen big eggs
  • In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the flour and eggs (see Note 2 below for instructions on how to accomplish this by hand)
  • Make use of the dough hook and begin mixing slowly until the dough comes together as a cohesive ball. Depending on whether the dough is dry or sticky, you may need to add a little amount of water or flour. Once the dough has formed a ball, raise the speed to medium and continue mixing for 5 minutes, or until the dough is smooth. Remove the dough from the bowl and wrap it tightly in clingfilm or wax paper (making sure it is completely covered so that it does not dry out) before placing it in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes and up to 12 hours. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and divide it into four equal pieces
  • To roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface, use a rolling pin (as described in Note 3) to spread the dough out as thinly as you can. You should be able to see the form of your hand just barely through the dough at this point
  • At this point, you can cut the spaghetti into whatever shape you choose. lasagna, ravioli, or tagliatelle are all made using large rectangles, squares, or strips of dough. For tagliatelle, lightly flour the top of the dough and roll it up loosely before slicing it into 12 cm (0.2″) thick strips
  • For ravioli, lightly flour the top of the dough and roll it up loosely before slicing it into 12 cm (0.2″) thick strips
  • For ravioli, lightly flour the top of the dough and roll it up loosely before slicing into 12 cm (0.2″) thick strips
  • For ravioli, lightly flour the top of the dough and roll it Separate the strands with your fingers and arrange them on a platter in parts
  • To cook the pasta, place it in a big pot of boiling water that has been properly seasoned. Bring the pot back to a boil and reduce the heat to low for 3 minutes. When the pasta is finished cooking, it should float to the surface of the water.

Note 1 – Flour swaps

Plain or all-purpose flour is what I’m using to make a pretty smooth pasta with a mild chewiness. You can substitute it with the following (in the same quantities):

  • Pasta flour, often known as 00’flour, is a protein-rich flour that is widely used to make smoother, chewier pasta.
  • Semolina flour- which is excellent for making a little rougher pasta that enables the sauce to cling to it better
  • Quinoa flour- which is excellent for making a somewhat smoother pasta that allows the sauce to cling to it better

Note 2 – Making the pasta by hand

If you don’t have a stand mixer, you may just make a huge mound of flour on your work area and stir it in. In a small mixing dish, softly whisk the eggs. Make a big well in the center of the flour and gently pour in the eggs. Repeat with the remaining flour. By adding little amounts of flour at a time, carefully integrate the flour into the eggs with a fork until the eggs and flour are completely combined. Make a ball out of the dough by shaping it with your hands. If the dough is really dry and crumbly, you may need to add a small amount of water.

Work the dough for 5 minutes on a lightly floured board, until it becomes smooth.

Note 3 – Rolling pin or Pasta Machine

It worked excellent as long as you keep the dough lightly greased and roll it out to the lightest thickness you can get it to be, which I did (it will swell a little when cooked). If you have a pasta machine, then take one of the quarter-sized pieces of dough and squash or roll it out somewhat flat in the machine to make pasta. Set your pasta machine to the widest setting and lightly coat the dough with flour before rolling it out. After that, run the pasta through the pasta machine to finish it.

Continue in this manner, decreasing the setting (and flouring the dough to keep it from sticking) until your dough is as thin as it can be made.

Making Fresh Pasta ahead

Prepare the pasta and then spread it out on a dusted baking sheet/plate/tray, sprinkling it with more flour as needed. This is a good place to leave it for a couple of hours, unattended. If you want the pasta to be entirely dry, leave it for a longer period of time (see more info on drying pasta below). 3 minutes is all it takes to cook from room temperature.

Refrigerated

If you wish to prepare the spaghetti a few days ahead of time, you may store it in the refrigerator.

Make the pasta, then spread it out on a floured baking sheet/plate/tray and sprinkle it with flour. Allow it to dry for a couple of hours at room temperature before covering it and storing it in the refrigerator for up to 2-3 days. Cooking time from a chilled state is 3 minutes.

Drying homemade pasta

Prepare the pasta, then spread it out on a floured baking sheet/plate/tray and sprinkle it with flour to coat it completely. Dry the pasta for 24 hours, or until it snaps easily in your hands. You should attempt to avoid putting the pasta in a humid area since it will not dry completely. Storage at room temperature for up to a month is possible once the product has been completely dried. Cooking time from dried ingredients is 4-7 minutes.

Freezing

Prepare the pasta and then spread it out on a dusted baking sheet/plate/tray, sprinkling it with more flour as needed. If you have the option, sprinkle the pasta with semolina flour before cooking it. This will assist to prevent the pasta from sticking together during cooking. If you don’t have any, you may use standard plain/all-purpose flour, which would work just as well. Cooking time from frozen is around 3-5 minutes.

Nutritional information is per serving (serves 6)

Calories:288kcal Carbohydrates:52g Protein:11g Fat:3g 1 gram of saturated fat Cholesterol:109mg Sodium:43mg Potassium:113mg Fiber:2g Sugar:1g Vitamin A: 158 International Units Calcium:27mg Iron:4mg Keywords: homemade, how to make homemade pasta, making fresh pasta, pasta, homemade pasta This post may include affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the links and purchase the product, I receive a tiny compensation (at no extra cost to you).

If you do decide to purchase, thank you very much!

The nutritional information supplied is a rough estimate that may change depending on a variety of circumstances.

Hi I’m Nicky

Calories:288kcal Carbohydrates:52g Protein:11g Fat:3g saturated fat: 1 gram saturated fat Cholesterol:109mg Sodium:43mg Potassium:113mg Fiber:2g Sugar:1g 158 International Units of Vitamin A Calcium:27mg Iron:4mg Made-at-home pasta, how to create homemade pasta, how to make freshly made spaghetti If you purchase a product after clicking on one of the affiliate links in this post, I will receive a small compensation from the company (at no extra cost to you).

See also:  How To Make Pasta In An Instant Pot

We appreciate your business if you decide to purchase.

The nutritional information supplied is a rough estimate that may vary depending on a variety of variables.

You Don’t Need Fancy Equipment to Make Fresh Pasta From Scratch

Please enjoy the following look inside the workings of my mind, which you most certainly did not ask for: I’m self-conscious while I’m eating fresh pasta. Or, at the very least, it did. For years, I was overwhelmed by the golden, glutenous aura that surrounded it, something that appeared to be simple yet was frequently marketed as a high-end undertaking. I was certain that creating and shaping pasta dough from home was completely out of my league because I lacked the necessary tools and specialised materials.

  • To be sure, you may make a huge batch of dough with foreign flours and cut it into perfectly shaped pieces with complicated equipment and cutters.
  • You don’t need much more than all-purpose flour, a rolling pin, and a knife to get that golden, glutenous glow on your own.
  • “I learnt how to make fresh pasta by hand from my grandmother, who grew up on a farm in Calabria.” The same very simple procedures she used, nothing fancy, may be used to get quite astounding outcomes, as she demonstrated.
  • ‘Pasta is something we eat a lot of in my family,’ she explains.
  • “There is beauty in the imperfections of things that are made by hand.” The only true obstacle in preparing fresh pasta at home is learning to put your confidence in your own abilities.

In her words, “Feelingfood is something that previous generations have always done, but we are more dependant on technology today.” “When I ask my mother if I followed her recipe correctly, she responds, ‘Just feel it!’ The ability to trust your intuition is important, and getting your hands filthy is absolutely beneficial.” To learn how to make fresh pasta—and get a bit messy while doing so—follow the steps outlined in this article.

Pick your dough

Using speciality flours, like as semolina or00, in some fresh pasta recipes can help you get the flavor and texture of a restaurant-quality noodle. However, all-purpose flour (which is likely to be simpler to come by at your local grocery store and is also less costly) can be used in place of bread flour with excellent results. Just make sure you choose a recipe (such as this one or this one) that expressly calls for all-purpose flour or that allows you to substitute it for regular flour. Thus, you will guarantee that the gluten level and consistency brought to the table by your more basic flour are well-matched by the remaining ingredients.

Specifically with all-purpose flour, Aita favors recipes that include a small amount of olive oil, which keeps your dough smooth and lubricated while also adding a richness to the end result.

Homemade Pasta WITHOUT a Pasta Maker (+soy peanut sauce!)

Danielle Kartes, food writer and cookbook author, demonstrates how to create fresh, handmade pasta without the aid of a pasta machine (instead, use a rolling pin or a wine bottle). Alternatively, a stand mixer (knead dough by hand). In addition, a quick and easy soy-peanut sauce is included for dipping. Find out how to create fresh pasta at home with a pasta maker in this article.

Ingredients

To make the pasta, use the following ingredients:

  • 2 12 cups flour, plus more flour as needed
  • 4 to 5 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon of extra-virgin olive oil

For the soy-peanut sauce (optional), combine the following ingredients:

  • In order to make the soy-peanut sauce (which is optional), combine the following ingredients.

Preparation

Put flour in a big mixing bowl or on a clean kitchen surface to start the pasta making process. Make a well in the center of the flour, pour in the eggs and olive oil, and stir until a shaggy dough forms. Knead for 15 to 20 minutes, adding flour as required, until the dough is smooth. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it aside for 30 to 60 minutes to rest. After the dough has rested, cut it into 8 equal pieces. Create a tiny rectangle out of each piece and run it through a pasta roller or by hand to make it as thin as possible.

Slice the noodles crosswise into the desired noodle form and arrange them in heaps, lightly dusting each pile with flour to prevent them from sticking together.

Add the noodles to the boiling water and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, or until they are al dente.

Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Toss the sauce into a heated pan and bring it to a simmer before tossing in the cooked pasta right into the boiling sauce. Add a cup of pasta water, a few tablespoons at a time, if necessary, to loosen the mixture, toss to coat, and then garnish with peanuts and scallions before serving.

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This Week on the Show

It is understandable that the prospect of cooking handmade noodles might be scary for the novice cook. However, making noodles from home is a really straightforward process: It takes only four common items to make our recipe for Fresh Pasta Without a Machine, and it doesn’t call for any specialist equipment (flour, eggs, olive oil, salt). Furthermore, choosing fresh pasta makes a world of difference when it comes to creating a dish that is truly outstanding. For a pasta dough that can be easily rolled out by hand (but still cooking up into delicate, springy noodles), we produce a super-malleable dough that does not snap back when it is rolled out (as opposed to a firm dough that snaps back).

  1. We also added an additional six egg yolks to the mix.
  2. However, because their proteins coagulate when heated, providing structure to the pasta, they help to guarantee that the pasta is robust enough to withstand being cooked.
  3. What is the secret to converting a lump of pasta dough into long, silky strands of pasta without the use of a pasta roller or other similar device?
  4. The dough should be soft enough that you can easily create a slit in it as shown: What remains after that is to divide the dough into tiny, manageable pieces and work with each piece one at a time until the dough is completely baked.
  5. Form the dough into a 6-inch cylinder and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap, allowing it to rest for at least 1 hour before baking.
  6. 1 piece is set aside; the remaining 5 pieces are rewrapped.
  7. Roll the dough into a 6-inch square with a rolling pin, then coat both sides with flour once more to seal in the moisture.
  8. Continue rolling the dough until it is 6 by 20 inches in size, raising it regularly to keep it from sticking to the counter.

Begin by gently folding the dry sheet in half at 2-inch intervals to form a flat, rectangular roll, starting with the short end. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into noodles that are 3/16 inch thick. Unfurl the pasta with your fingers, then move it to a baking sheet dusted with flour.

How to make pasta from scratch without a machine

Learn all you need to know about making fresh pasta from scratch by hand in this instructional video. This beginner’s guide to handmade pasta will answer all of your questions about how to make, roll, and cook fresh pasta from scratch. Eating fresh handmade egg pasta is a very different experience than eating store-bought egg pasta, and it is well worth the time and work it takes to prepare it. Because it has an exceptionally smooth and sensitive texture with a slight bite, it can be used to make gorgeous meals that can be customized with different flavors and fillings.

Basic pasta dough recipe

Ingredients Extra flour for dusting is needed in addition to the 3 cups (450g) 00′ flour. 1 teaspoon of salt 4 eggs (60g each) 1 egg yolk (optional) 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Method

  1. Create a circular mound of flour and salt on a clean work area by spooning the ingredients together. Make a deep hole in the center of the flour mound, ensuring sure the edges of the mound are high and thick to assist keep all of the egg mixture contained inside the flour
  2. Pour in the oil after cracking the eggs and egg yolk into the well. Whisk the eggs with a fork, pulling the flour off the edges of the bowl. Toss the dough around until all of the flour has been mixed and the dough has formed a sticky shaggy consistency. Mix the dough together with floured hands, including any remaining flour from the bench to produce a firm but sticky dough
  3. Set aside. To make the pasta, sprinkle a little more flour on the work surface and knead it by pressing it down and forward, turning the dough 45 degrees after each push. For 5-10 minutes, or until the dough is silky smooth, elastic, and bounces back when lightly pushed with your finger, continue to work the dough. To make a smooth dough, add additional flour until the mixture is no longer sticky or moist. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap once it has been flattened into a disk. Before rolling out, let 30-60 minutes of resting time at room temperature.

Watch the video below to see how it’s done, and then download the recipes for fettuccine, lasagne, and ravioli that you can make with your own pasta dough. Get the recipe, which you may save to yourmyfoodbookcookbooks by clicking on the following link: Pasta Dough from Scratch

Pasta dough making tips

Is it necessary to have a pasta machine in order to create pasta? No, all you need is a sturdy work surface and a rolling pin of appropriate size to produce pasta! It is possible to speed up and simplify the operation by using a pasta machine, although it is not required. What is the best type of flour to use for making pasta? 00 flour is the best flour to use making pasta dough. Traditional uses for pasta include finely milled flour with a high protein content, which produces a silky texture with nice bite and a silky texture with a high level of protein.

  1. Yes, you may use the same amount of unbleached plain or all-purpose flour for the 00 flour in this recipe.
  2. Is it possible to create this recipe with various sized eggs?
  3. You may, however, experiment with different-sized eggs and adjust the consistency of the dough by adding flour or water as needed.
  4. Yes, seasoning pasta with salt not only enhances its flavor, but it also helps to strengthen the gluten strands in the wheat, resulting in a more consistent texture.
  5. Resting time for pasta dough can range from 30 minutes to 2 hours.

How to roll out fresh pasta dough

  1. Divide the dough into four pieces, one of which should be put aside, and wrap the remaining pieces in cling film or a clean tea towel. Additional flour should be kept on hand for dusting, and a baking sheet sprinkled with extra flour should be prepared for your completed pasta
  2. Start by dusting the work area and rolling pin with a little flour before beginning to roll. Repeat this action after each roll until the dough is at least 1mm thick. After each roll, make a quarter turn and repeat the same process. In order to make rolling out simpler, try to keep the form and size of the dough generally consistent from beginning to end. If the sheet of dough gets too long, it may be split in half on a cutting board by slicing it in two. Dust one half of the dough with flour and cover it with a tea towel, then repeat the same with the other half
  3. Alternatively, once the dough has been rolled out, cover it while you finish rolling the remainder, or cut and form your pasta shapes and lay them on trays coated with more flour. Continue to make the remaining pasta while you sprinkle additional flour on top and cover it with a clean cloth.

What is it about my pasta dough that makes it so difficult to roll out? If your pasta dough is tough to roll out and keeps springing back into place, cover it with a clean kitchen towel and set it alone for another 15 minutes before continuing. Resting the dough causes the flour to absorb more water and the gluten network to relax and become more flexible. If the dough hasn’t been let to rest long enough, it will be too dry and elastic to roll out. If your pasta dough has rested but still seems rough and rips instead of rolling out easily, it is possible that it is not enough hydrated.

Allow yourself another period of relaxation before rolling out.

If it is still excessively sticky, it may be due to an excessive amount of moisture.

What is causing my handmade pasta to be chewy?

If your pasta is chewy after it has been cooked, it is likely that it is overly thick. Take your time and roll out the dough as thin as possible, to around 1mm thick at the most. By looking through the dough, you should be able to make out the outline of your hand.

How to cook fresh pasta

  1. Bring a big saucepan of salted water to a boil before starting to cook the fresh pasta. A decent rule of thumb is to add 1 tablespoon of salt to every 4 litres of water. Adding more salt is optional. This amount of water is sufficient to cook 500 grams of pasta at a single time. As soon as the water comes to a boil, add the fresh pasta in tiny batches. Stir immediately to separate the strands of spaghetti and prevent the pasta from adhering to the bottom of the skillet
  2. Cook for approximately one and a half minutes for each batch. Keep an eye out for changes in color and texture. Prepared pasta will be soft and yet have a bite to it in the center when it is done. Fresh pasta that has been undercooked will have a pasty texture due to the uncooked egg and flour. Toss sauce through quickly after draining and before adding it to the sauce.
See also:  How Many Pounds Of Pasta Salad For 50

How to store pasta dough

You may keep pasta dough either wrapped or unrolled, depending on your preference. The following are the instructions for storing a ball of pasta dough in the refrigerator: Wrap the dough securely in cling wrap and place it in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. It is important to note that the dough will have a greyish hue; while this may appear unusual, it will have no effect on the flavor or texture. The following are the instructions for storing a ball of pasta dough in the freezer: Refrigerate for up to three weeks after wrapping securely in cling wrap and placing it in a zip-lock bag, pressing out as much air as possible.

The following are the instructions for storing pasta shapes in the refrigerator: Use within two days after tossing with more flour and storing in a zip-lock bag.

Then seal it in a zip-lock bag with a label and store it in the freezer for up to 8 months.

What to make with fresh pasta dough

Learn how to make this dish: Creamy Chicken, Mushroom, and Chive Fettuccine Fettuccine is one of the most straightforward forms to make using fresh pasta dough. Preparing a simple chicken and mushroom sauce will allow you to enjoy your freshly cooked pasta. Here’s how to get the recipe: Lasagne with Pumpkin and Spinach (Roasted Pumpkin and Spinach) Make your dough into lasagna sheets by rolling it out. If you don’t want to prepare a traditional lasagne, try this equally wonderful vegetarian variation made with sweet roasted pumpkin and spinach instead.

Make ravioli by stuffing your pasta with a delectable filling and rolling it in a delicious sauce.

Get more recipes from scratch

Here’s how to make it: Creamy Chicken with Mushrooms and Chive Fettuccine It is one of the most basic forms for fresh pasta dough, and it is also one of the most delicious. Fresh pasta should be served with a simple chicken and mushroom sauce. The recipe may be found here. Veggie Lasagne with Roasted Pumpkin and Spinach Make lasagna sheets out of your dough. If you don’t want to prepare a traditional lasagne, try this equally wonderful vegetarian variation made with roasted sweet pumpkin and spinach.

With a Simple Tomato Sauce, Chicken and Mushroom Ravioli are served.

Creamy Chicken, Mushroom and Chive Fettuccine

* This content may include affiliate and sponsored links for your convenience. For additional information, please see the myAffiliate Disclosure document. What if I told you that you don’t need a pasta maker to produce your own handmade pasta? Simply because it is true, and it is more simpler than you may imagine! Making handmade pasta from scratch has been a long-held ambition of mine for a very long time. The problem is that when pasta is as inexpensive and readily available as it is at the grocery store, it’s difficult to justify cooking it from scratch every time.

  • Homemade pasta, like other standard meals that call for a mix of eggs, flour, and water, isn’t difficult to prepare in the least.
  • Unfortunately, I do not have a pasta maker, thus I have avoided even attempting to make my own pasta at home for fear that it will be too difficult without one.
  • Using a pasta machine simply facilitates the process of rolling out the dough to a very thin layer and cutting it very straight and evenly.
  • It was also difficult to make the dough as thin as you could have using a machine.

*** Update ***

The pasta maker attachment for our KitchenAid stand mixer has since been handed to us, and I have to say that I much prefer using the pasta maker to prepare my dough since I first published this piece a year ago. While rolling out pasta dough by hand is simple and can be done in a pinch (and, let’s be honest, it just feels more authentic when you’re rolling out the dough with a rolling pin like an Italian nonna;), using a pasta maker is significantly faster and easier, and the pasta is rolled and cut much thinner than if you were to do it by hand, which is something I prefer.

  1. There are a plethora of reasonably priced solutions available on the market, but they are not all created equal.
  2. While it is possible to roll out your dough by hand, if you want to make homemade pasta on a frequent basis, I strongly advise you to invest in a pasta maker to save time and effort.
  3. As with everything else that is prepared from scratch, such as homemade bread or fresh tomatoes, it is difficult to go back to store-bought pasta after having tried the handmade version!
  4. Follow the same recipe and procedures as listed below if you’re using a pasta maker, but instead of rolling out the dough with a rolling pin, pass it through your pasta machine to make the dough even thinner.

How to make homemade pasta without a pasta maker

It goes without saying that you must begin by creating your pasta dough. The noodles are made from eggs, so you’ll need 6 of them along with 4 to 4112 cups of all-purpose flour to make them. (While semolina flour is typically used in the preparation of pasta, all-purpose flour is acceptable when creating your own.) Using 4 cups of flour, form a well in the center of your mixing bowl, a big plate, or the surface of your kitchen counter top. Fill the well with one or two of the eggs and carefully start scooping the flour into the centre, mixing it with the eggs, being careful not to break the well if you are doing this directly on your counter.

  • Alternatively, a stand mixer can be used.
  • On the other hand, I believe that cooking pasta would be incomplete without kneading it like a nonna;) Then, one at a time, pour in the remaining eggs into the well, mixing them in with the flour until the dough begins to form.
  • Lightly dust your surface as well as your hands before transferring the dough ball to your worktop.
  • Form a small well in the centre of the dough with two fingers and pour in one tablespoon of water to make it pliable.
  • As you knead the dough, add the remaining two tablespoons of water if you discover that you need them to get the dough to stay together and begin to smooth out as you go.
  • When creating dough by hand, however, it is much easier to achieve a lovely, smooth dough.
  • If the dough is really sticky, you can add up to an additional 12 cup of flour, one tablespoon at a time, working your way through the dough.
  • This is absolutely NOT smooth enough at this time!

Dough should be smooth and elastic after about 10 minutes of kneading. It should not adhere to your hands or the counter at this point. Allow about half an hour of resting time after wrapping in plastic wrap or a plastic bag (both of which may be recycled). That’s a beautiful, seamless transition:)

Rollingcutting your pasta dough by hand

When preparing fresh pasta by hand, the most difficult phase is rolling out the dough since it is difficult to make the spaghetti as thin as you would want using a rolling pin. However, you can still stretch it out thin enough to produce a lovely dish of handmade pasta if you don’t have a pasta maker on hand; if you don’t have one, a rolling pin will suffice. Using a light dusting of flour, lightly flour your work area once again and divide the dough into four equal sections. Each section should be rolled out one at a time.

  1. We’re aiming for a thickness of around 1/8 of an inch, or as close to that as feasible.
  2. You may repurpose the surplus dough by rolling the chopped edges into one of the other pieces of dough.
  3. Either a pizza cutter or a kitchen knife would suffice.
  4. Discard the water from your pasta and hang it to dry on a pasta dryer, or create your own as we did!
  5. It worked perfectly and was also visually appealing;) Here’s another look at it.
  6. The other night, we threw a family party at our house since it’s important to keep things interesting during a quarantine!
  7. Allow 15 to 20 minutes for the pasta to air dry before cooking or storing it in a container.
  8. To prepare the pasta, bring a pot of salted water to a boil and add the fresh spaghetti to the saucepan.
  9. The cooking time can vary between 5 and 10 minutes, depending on how thick and dry your noodles are, and whether or not you want your pasta al dente or a little softer than you would like it.
  10. After you have strained the water out of the noodles, pour a little amount of olive oil over them and toss to coat them in order to prevent them from sticking together.

You may top your spaghetti with your favorite sauce or a bit extra olive oil and parmesan cheese, or you can eat it as you choose! Prepare a side of homemade bread coated in homemade garlic herb butter to go with it. Drool?

How to store homemade pasta

To prepare your pasta ahead of time and preserve it for later use, you may either keep it bent in half after hanging it to dry or bend it into small nests by gently winding noodles around your fingers and storing it in a Ziplock bag in the refrigerator for future use (homemade fresh pasta will store in the fridge for about 2 to 3 days). Alternatively, you may freeze them for 2 to 3 months by placing them in the freezer. Alternatively, you may dehydrate pasta and keep it in your cupboard in the same way that you would store dry shop-bought spaghetti.

  1. Homemade pasta can also be dried in the oven, although it will take longer to dry this way.
  2. CAUTION: Dried handmade pasta is shelf stable when completely dried; but, any moisture left on the surface of the pasta may enable hazardous germs to grow, rendering the pasta unfit for human consumption.
  3. It is possible to cook dried handmade pasta in the same manner that dry store-bought pasta is prepared.
  4. However, always test one noodle to make sure it’s done to your satisfaction before straining the others, in case you need to simmer them for a little longer than you anticipated.
  5. Making homemade pasta without the use of a pasta maker: It’s really that simple.
  6. After that, invest in a pasta machine, and you could find yourself never again purchasing pasta from the grocery store.

Ingredients

  • 4 to 412 cups flour
  • 6 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons water (about)

Instructions

  1. Put 4 cups of flour in a mixing bowl, a big plate, or directly onto your countertop and form a well in the center of the flour to hold all of your ingredients. Gently start scooping the flour into the center of the well, a little bit at a time, mixing it in with the eggs after each egg is cracked into the well. Add the eggs one at a time, stirring constantly, until the mixture has the consistency of a shaggy dough ball. To move the dough ball to your countertop, lightly dust your work surface and place it there. To make the dough come together, knead it by hand for a couple of minutes until it starts to come together
  2. Form a small well in the centre of the dough with two fingers and pour in one tablespoon of water to make it pliable. Using your hands, gently fold in the water into the dough while continuing to knead it. Add the remaining two tablespoons of water in the same manner, one tablespoon at a time as necessary to get the dough to stick together and begin to smooth itself out. If the dough is coming together nicely, it is not essential to add any further water. However, while creating the dough by hand, it is easier to achieve a good, smooth dough
  3. If the dough is really sticky, you may need to add up to an additional 12 cup of flour, but do it slowly and carefully, one tablespoon at a time. You really want to keep the egg to flour ratio as high as possible, so don’t add too much flour unless absolutely necessary. Dough should be smooth and elastic after about 10 minutes of kneading, but should not adhere to your hands or the counter. Wrap the chicken in plastic wrap or a plastic bag (which you can reuse) and leave it aside for half an hour to rest. Using a light dusting of flour, lightly flour your work area once again and divide the dough into four equal sections. Each section should be rolled out one at a time. Roll it out into a long rectangle with your rolling pin until it is as thin as you can make it
  4. And Once you’ve rolled out the dough, trim the edges with a knife or a pizza cutter so that you have a perfectly rectangular shape to work with. Use a pizza cutter or a kitchen knife to cut your dough into pasta noodles that are approximately the diameter of fettuccini or thinner
  5. Then bake until golden brown. Make a separate pile of pasta and hang it to dry on a pasta drier or something similar (if you don’t have anything else to hang your spaghetti on, you may use the handle of your oven). Allow 15 to 20 minutes for the pasta to air dry before cooking or storing it in a container. It is critical to allow fresh pasta to dry for a short period of time even before cooking in order to avoid the noodles from sticking together. To prepare the pasta, bring a pot of salted water to a boil and add the fresh spaghetti to the saucepan. Cook until the noodles are done (test one of the noodles to make sure it’s done to your liking before draining the water out)
  6. To prepare your pasta ahead of time and save it for later, you can either bend the spaghetti into small nests and store them in the fridge for later (prepared fresh pasta will keep in the fridge for approximately 2 to 3 days) or throw them in the freezer and store them for up to 2 to 3 months. Alternatively, you may dehydrate pasta and store it in your cupboard in the same way that you would dry shop purchased spaghetti. In order to dehydrate your pasta, either dry it in a dehydrator at 135oF for approximately 3 or 4 hours, or air dry it until the noodles are totally dry and snap in half easily before putting them in a plastic bag or a container in your pantry.

I wish you happiness that is handmade, cultivated, and produced on your own land.

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