How Many Calories In Whole Wheat Pasta

Is Whole Wheat Pasta Really Any Healthier Than White Pasta?

For years, pasta has received a terrible reputation as being unhealthy, which is why carbohydrate enthusiasts throughout the world delighted when companies began promoting whole wheat pasta varieties. According to them, whole grains are beneficial to one’s health; thus, whole grain pasta must be the solution to their eating-well challenge. However, while the latter may be more nutrient-dense, the former is unquestionably more delicious. So, do you really have to give up flavor in order to get the health benefits?

The Claim:

Whole wheat pasta is more nutritious than white pasta because it has a higher concentration of nutrients such as complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, and zinc than white pasta. White pasta, on the other hand, is formed of refined carbohydrates, which means that it has been stripped of numerous nutrients during the production process.

The Evidence:

Whole wheat pasta is more nutritious than white pasta because it has a higher concentration of nutrients such as complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, zinc, and other minerals and nutrients. White pasta, on the other hand, is composed mostly of refined carbohydrates, which means that it has been stripped of numerous nutrients throughout the manufacturing and processing processes.

  • Whole wheat pasta is more nutritious than white pasta because it has a higher concentration of nutrients such as complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, and zinc. White pasta, on the other hand, is formed of refined carbohydrates, which means that it has been stripped of numerous nutrients during the manufacturing process.

One serving (2 ounces) of white pasta comprises the following ingredients:

  • A 200-calorie meal with 42 grams of carbohydrates, 7 grams of protein, and 3 grams of fiber
  • Some iron but no magnesium or zinc

So, what exactly does that imply, exactly? Because refined grains are processed considerably more quickly than complex carbohydrates, they have been found to induce an increase in blood sugar and insulin levels. Because they are not as satisfying as complex carbohydrates, you may be more prone to overindulge, which can lead to obesity and the disorders that accompany it. Carbohydrates are your body’s primary source of fuel during a ride, and if you don’t consume enough of them, you’re likely to bonk.

For the minerals, magnesium helps to keep your blood pressure under control and your bones strong, iron provides you energy, and zinc helps to improve your immune system and speed the healing of any scrapes or bruises you may have had while driving.

The Verdict:

While whole wheat pasta has a slew of true health benefits, Rizzo believes that pushing yourself to eat something you don’t enjoy is a waste of time. For some, whole wheat pasta simply doesn’t taste as nice as traditional white spaghetti. “If you want to eat white spaghetti, go ahead and do it, but be mindful of the portion quantity,” Rizzo advises. ” “Most people should definitely eat two portions,” says the author. This material has been imported from another source. Visiting their website may allow you to access the same stuff in a different format, or it may provide you with even more information than you could get elsewhere.

While it is true that refined grains such as white pasta are thought to be higher on the scale, this may not be as significant as you may assume in the long run.

“Because people with diabetes require more carbohydrates in their diet, eating items that are higher on the glycemic index isn’t always a bad idea.” Furthermore, the glycemic index of individual meals does not take into consideration the way people really eat things in the real world: in combination rather than in isolation.

  1. The way you construct a meal has an impact on how quickly your blood sugar levels will rise and fall.
  2. Weil.
  3. You shouldn’t go crazy and serve up a heaping bowl of quinoa every day, and you should also pay attention to the other elements that go into putting together the meal.
  4. Another point to keep in mind: For those carbohydrate loading before a race, whole wheat pasta may really be a bad decision.
  5. What’s the bottom line?
  6. “I personally believe that certain meals should not be completely avoided,” Rizzo explains.

You may be able to discover further information on this and other related items at the website piano.io.

Eat This Much, your personal diet assistant

Nutrition Facts
For a Serving Size of (g)
How many calories are in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of calories in Whole wheat pasta:Calories Calories from Fat(%)
% Daily Value *
How much fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of fat in Whole wheat pasta:Total Fat
How much saturated fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of saturated fat in Whole wheat pasta:Saturated fat
How much monounsaturated fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of monounsaturated fat in Whole wheat pasta:Monounsaturated fat
How much polyunsaturated fat is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of polyunsaturated fat in Whole wheat pasta:Polyunsaturated fat
How much sodium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of sodium in Whole wheat pasta:Sodium
How much potassium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of potassium in Whole wheat pasta:Potassium
How many carbs are in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of carbs in Whole wheat pasta:Carbohydrates
How many net carbs are in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of net carbs in Whole wheat pasta:Net carbs
How much sugar is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of sugar in Whole wheat pasta:Sugar
How much fiber is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of fiber in Whole wheat pasta:Fiber
How much protein is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of protein in Whole wheat pasta:Protein
Vitamins and minerals
How much Vitamin A is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin A in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin A
How much Vitamin A IU is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin A IU in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin A IU
How much Vitamin B6 is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin B6 in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin B6
How much Vitamin B12 is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin B12 in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin B12
How much Vitamin C is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin C in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin C
How much Vitamin D is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin D in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin D
How much Vitamin D IU is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin D IU in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin D IU
How much Vitamin E is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin E in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin E
How much Vitamin K is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Vitamin K in Whole wheat pasta:Vitamin K
How much Caffeine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Caffeine in Whole wheat pasta:Caffeine
How much Calcium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Calcium in Whole wheat pasta:Calcium
How much Iron is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Iron in Whole wheat pasta:Iron
How much Magnesium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Magnesium in Whole wheat pasta:Magnesium
How much Phosphorus is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Phosphorus in Whole wheat pasta:Phosphorus
How much Zinc is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Zinc in Whole wheat pasta:Zinc
How much Copper is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Copper in Whole wheat pasta:Copper
How much Manganese is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Manganese in Whole wheat pasta:Manganese
How much Selenium is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Selenium in Whole wheat pasta:Selenium
How much Retinol is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Retinol in Whole wheat pasta:Retinol
How much Lycopene is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Lycopene in Whole wheat pasta:Lycopene
How much Thiamine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Thiamine in Whole wheat pasta:Thiamine
How much Riboflavin is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Riboflavin in Whole wheat pasta:Riboflavin
How much Niacin is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Niacin in Whole wheat pasta:Niacin
How much Folate is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Folate in Whole wheat pasta:Folate
How much Choline is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Choline in Whole wheat pasta:Choline
How much Betaine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Betaine in Whole wheat pasta:Betaine
How much Water is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Water in Whole wheat pasta:Water
Fatty acids
Amino acids
How much Tryptophan is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Tryptophan in Whole wheat pasta:Tryptophan
How much Threonine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Threonine in Whole wheat pasta:Threonine
How much Isoleucine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Isoleucine in Whole wheat pasta:Isoleucine
How much Leucine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Leucine in Whole wheat pasta:Leucine
How much Lysine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Lysine in Whole wheat pasta:Lysine
How much Methionine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Methionine in Whole wheat pasta:Methionine
How much Cystine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Cystine in Whole wheat pasta:Cystine
How much Phenylalanine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Phenylalanine in Whole wheat pasta:Phenylalanine
How much Tyrosine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Tyrosine in Whole wheat pasta:Tyrosine
How much Valine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Valine in Whole wheat pasta:Valine
How much Arginine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Arginine in Whole wheat pasta:Arginine
How much Histidine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Histidine in Whole wheat pasta:Histidine
How much Alanine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Alanine in Whole wheat pasta:Alanine
How much Aspartic acid is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Aspartic acid in Whole wheat pasta:Aspartic acid
How much Glutamic acid is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Glutamic acid in Whole wheat pasta:Glutamic acid
How much Glycine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Glycine in Whole wheat pasta:Glycine
How much Proline is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Proline in Whole wheat pasta:Proline
How much Serine is in Whole wheat pasta? Amount of Serine in Whole wheat pasta:Serine
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs.

Whole Grain Spaghetti: Nutrition Facts & More

Even though whole wheat pasta has several actual health benefits, Rizzo believes that pushing yourself to eat something you don’t enjoy is counterproductive; for some, whole wheat pasta just does not taste as nice as white spaghetti. “It’s fine to eat white spaghetti if you want to,” Rizzo explains, “but make sure you watch the portion quantity.” It is likely that the majority of individuals should consume two portions. You may get more information about where this content came from here: If you go to their website, you may be able to access the same content in a different format, as well as more information.

  • While it is true that refined grains such as white pasta are thought to be higher on the scale, this may not be as significant as you may assume in terms of health.
  • As a result, eating meals that are higher on the glycemic index aren’t always a negative thing for those who require more carbohydrates in their diet.
  • Instead of simply eating a bowl of pasta and calling it a day, you’re most likely tossing it with sauce and serving it with a side dish or two.
  • Adding a starchy carb to a meal along with a protein, fat, and some fiber can help to control blood sugar levels, preventing you from experiencing an energy boost followed by a crash, according to Dr.
  • Do not be concerned if you prefer the flavor of white spaghetti.
  • You shouldn’t go crazy and serve up a heaping bowl of quinoa every day, and you should also pay attention to the other items that go into putting up the entire meal.
  • There’s one more thing to remember: For those carbohydrate loading before a race, whole wheat pasta may really be a bad idea.
  • Ultimately, what’s important is that Observe the golden rule of moderation and indulge in any variety of pasta you darn well choose!
  • While pasta is one of my favorite foods, I understand that some people don’t like other types of pasta.

If you go to piano.io, you may be able to get further information on this and other related topics.

Perfect for.

While whole wheat pasta has a slew of true health benefits, Rizzo believes that pushing yourself to eat something you don’t enjoy is a waste of time. For some, whole wheat pasta simply doesn’t taste as nice as white spaghetti. “If you want to eat white spaghetti, go ahead and do it, but watch the portion quantity,” Rizzo advises. “Most people should definitely take two portions,” says the chef. This information was imported from another source. You may be able to access the same stuff in a different format on their website, or you may be able to discover more information there.

See also:  What Does One Serving Of Pasta Look Like

While it is true that refined grains such as white pasta are ranked higher on the scale, this may not be as significant as you believe.

“Because people with diabetes require more carbohydrates in their diet, eating items that are higher on the glycemic index aren’t always a negative thing.” Furthermore, the glycemic index of individual meals does not take into consideration the way people really eat items in the real world: in combination rather than in isolation.

  1. The way you construct a meal has an impact on how rapidly your blood sugar will rise and decrease.
  2. Oz.
  3. Don’t go crazy and dish up a large bowl of soup every day, and make sure you’re paying attention to the other items that make up the remainder of the meal.
  4. Serve your spaghetti with some chicken and a sprinkling of veggies on top, such as zucchini.
  5. In that situation, the high fiber level of the product may cause stomach trouble and gastrointestinal irritation, according to Rizzo.
  6. “I personally believe that certain meals should not be avoided completely,” Rizzo explains.

In order to assist visitors in providing their email addresses, this material was produced and maintained by a third party and imported into this page. You may be able to discover further information on this and other related topics at the website piano.io.

Suitable For

More Information about Allergens

IngredientsNutrition

Additional Information about Allergens

COOKING YOUR PASTA

Preparation: Bring 4 to 6 quarts of water to a boil, season with salt to taste. Fill a pot halfway with boiling water and add the contents of the packet. Gently stir the ingredients together. Bring the water back to a boil. Cook the pasta for 7 minutes, uncovered and stirring occasionally, to achieve the original “al dente” texture. Boil the pasta for an extra 1 minute if you want it more tender. Remove the pan from the heat. Drain the water well. Make a quick sauce using your favorite Barilla sauce and serve immediately.

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Calories in 1 cup of Whole Wheat Spaghetti (Cooked) and Nutrition Facts

Nutritional Values per ServingCalories174 percent of the Daily Values* 0.761g1 percent Saturated Fat0.139g1 percent Transfat-Polyunsaturated Fat0.298g Total Fat0.76g1 percent Saturated Fat0.139g1 percent Saturated Fat0.298g fat from monounsaturated fatty acids (0.105g) Sodium4mg0 percent Cholesterol0mg0 percent Cholesterol0mg0 percent Carbohydrates: 37.16g14 percent Dietary Fiber: 6.3g23 percent Sugars: 37.16g14 percent 1.12g Protein7.46g 21 milligrams of vitamin D and calcium Iron (1.488mg) Potassium (62mg) Vitamin A (mcg) Vitamin C (mg) Vitamin D (mcg) * The percent Daily Value (DV) of a nutrient in a portion of food indicates how much that nutrient contributes to a person’s daily diet.

For general nutrition guidance, 2,000 calories per day is recommended.

FatSecret Platform API is the source of this information.

Calorie Breakdown:Carbohydrate (80%)Fat (4%)Protein (16%)

The following calculations were made using an RDI of 2000 calories: What is my Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for this supplement?

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There are174 caloriesin 1 cup of Whole Wheat Spaghetti (Cooked).
Calorie breakdown:4% fat, 80% carbs, 16% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Serving Size Calories
1 oz 35
100 g 124
1 cup 174
1 lb 562

Related Types of Spaghetti:

Whole Wheat Spaghetti Noodles with Meat Sauce
Meatless Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce
Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce and Vegetables
Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce and Meatballs
Spaghetti
Whole Wheat Spaghetti
view more spaghetti nutritional info

Related Types of Pasta:

Macaroni
Meatless Pasta with Tomato Sauce
Lasagna with Meat
Pasta with Meat Sauce
view more pasta nutritional info

See Also:

Meatless Whole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Whole Wheat Spaghetti (Fat Not Added in Cooking)
Whole Wheat Bread
100% Whole Wheat Bagel
view more results

Used in these Member Recipes:

Creamy Vegetable Pasta
Tuna Whole Grain Noodle Casserole
Shrimp Linguine
Whole Wheat MacCheese
Creamy Curry Pasta Primavera
Italian Peasant Soup
Italian Pasta Salad

Whole-Grain Pasta vs. Regular Pasta

Whole-grain pasta and its normal white-pasta cousin share several characteristics, such as similar calorie counts and macronutrient profiles, that distinguish them from one another. Whole-grain pasta, on the other hand, outperforms conventional pasta when it comes to critical nutrients. Increase your consumption of whole-grain pastas to gain the health advantages of the added fiber and minerals they provide.

Whole-Grain vs. Regular Defined

During the growth process, all grains are made up of the entire seed – bran, germ, and endosperm. The process of milling grains into flour may change the content of the grain. A “whole grain” flour, which is used to produce pasta and bread, has undergone less processing and hence keeps all three constituents in greater quantity. But when it comes to conventional white flour, producers remove the bran and germ, leaving just the starchy endosperm behind. Despite the fact that many consumers prefer the flavor of normal pasta, which is not as chewy as whole-grain pasta, white pasta gets depleted of essential nutrients throughout the manufacturing process.

Macronutrients in Whole-Grain and Regular Pasta

The macronutrient profiles of the two types of pasta are very similar to one another. The same amount of whole wheat rotini (a typical whole grain) contains 159 calories per cup serving, while the same amount of normal rotini contains 169 calories. Protein is included in little amounts (approximately 0.5 grams per serving), while fat is present in small amounts (about 1 gram per serving). Whole-wheat pasta, on the other hand, has more than double the fiber of normal pasta, providing you with 17 percent of the daily requirement for this nutrient on a 2,000-calorie diet, as opposed to only 8 percent for regular pasta on the same diet.

Fiber is necessary to maintain good gut health, to keep you feeling full to aid with weight control, and to help you have lower cholesterol levels in your blood.

Vitamin Comparison

The process of refining flour for normal pasta removes the majority of the B vitamins from it. Known together as the B vitamins, they are a group of eight vitamins that work together to help you digest the food you consume into energy, repair DNA, produce red blood cells, and maintain healthy neurological function. In 2016, a study published in the journal Nutrients stressed the relevance of the B vitamins in maintaining brain function, particularly in the elderly. In comparison, a cup of whole-wheat pasta provides 13 percent of the daily value (DV) for thiamin (vitamin B-1) and 17 percent for niacin (vitamin B-3), whereas a cup of conventional pasta has no thiamin and just 2 percent of the daily value (DV) for niacin (vitamin B-3).

Folate is particularly essential for pregnant women since it aids in the prevention of congenital abnormalities.

Mineral Comparison

Whole-grain pasta also retains a higher proportion of its mineral value than refined pasta. A cup of whole-wheat pasta contains 10 percent of the Daily Value (DV) for iron, but a cup of standard white pasta has just 3 percent. Iron is responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Whole-wheat pasta also contains more than 10 percent of the daily value for magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and manganese – more than double the levels found in normal pasta – as well as more than twice the amount found in regular pasta.

Copper and manganese are essential components of several enzymes.

A serving of standard pasta has 40% of the daily value (DV), whereas a serving of whole wheat contains 55% of the DV.

Choosing Whole-Grain Products

Aside from whole wheat, additional whole-grain pastas to consider include amaranth, brown rice, quinoa, and spelt, to name a few. If you want to make sure the pasta you buy is whole grain, look for statements on the box such as “100 percent whole wheat.” Using words like “whole grain” or “stoneground whole wheat” at the beginning of the ingredient list should be standard practice. “Wheat flour,” “organic flour,” “durum wheat,” and “multigrain” are all terms that might refer to flour that has had sections of the grain removed, whereas “enriched flour” refers to a refined pasta product.

Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat nutrition facts and analysis.

Nutrition Facts
Portion Size 117 g
Amount Per Portion 174
Calories
% Daily Value *
Total Fat2g 3 %
Saturated Fat 0.3g 2 %
Sodium4.7mg 0 %
Total Carbohydrate35g 13 %
Dietary Fiber 4.6g 16 %
Sugar 0.9g
Protein7g 14 %
Vitamin D 0mcg 0 %
Calcium 15mg 1 %
Iron 2mg 11 %
Potassium 112mg 2 %
* The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contribute to a daily diet.2000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
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Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat nutrition facts and analysis per 1 cup spaghetti not packed (117 g)

Vitamins
Nutrient Amount DV
Vitamin A, RAE 0.00 mcg 0 %
Carotene, alpha 0.00 mcg
Carotene, beta 2.34 mcg
Cryptoxanthin, beta 0.00 mcg
Lutein+zeaxanthin 109.98 mcg
Lycopene 0.00 mcg
Retinol 0.00 mcg
Thiamin 0.183 mg 15 %
Riboflavin 0.116 mg 9 %
Niacin 3.657 mg 23 %
Pantothenic acid 0.314 mg 6 %
Vitamin B6 0.109 mg 8 %
Vitamin B12 0.00 mcg 0 %
Vitamin B12, added 0.00 mcg
Folate, DFE 24.57 mcg 6 %
Folate, food 24.57 mcg
Folic acid 0.00 mcg
Vitamin C 0.0 mg 0 %
Vitamin D 0.00 mcg 0 %
Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) 0.27 mg 1 %
Vitamin E, added 0.00 mg
Tocopherol, alpha 0.27 mg
Tocopherol, beta 0.09 mg
Tocopherol, delta 0.00 mg
Tocopherol, gamma 0.11 mg
Tocotrienol, alpha 0.21 mg
Tocotrienol, beta 1.36 mg
Tocotrienol, delta 0.00 mg
Tocotrienol, gamma 0.00 mg
Vitamin K 0.7 mcg 1 %
Vitamin K1 0.7 mcg
Vitamin K2 0.0 mcg
Dihydro phylloquinone 0.0 mcg
Choline 7.6 mg
Minerals
Nutrient Amount DV
Calcium, Ca 15.21 mg 1 %
Copper, Cu 0.26 mg 29 %
Iron, Fe 2.01 mg 11 %
Magnesium, Mg 63.18 mg 16 %
Manganese, Mn 1.546 mg 67 %
Phosphorus, P 148.59 mg 21 %
Potassium, K 112.32 mg 2 %
Selenium, Se 42.47 mcg 77 %
Sodium, Na 4.68 mg 0 %
Zinc, Zn 1.57 mg 14 %
Proteins and Aminoacids
Nutrient Amount DV
Protein 7.01 g 14 %
Alanine 0.218 g
Arginine 0.247 g
Aspartic acid 0.316 g
Cystine 0.146 g
Glutamic acid 2.427 g
Glycine 0.254 g
Histidine 0.164 g 23 %
Isoleucine 0.271 g 19 %
Leucine 0.479 g 18 %
Lysine 0.156 g 7 %
Methionine 0.113 g
Phenylalanine 0.349 g
Proline 0.746 g
Serine 0.342 g
Threonine 0.188 g 18 %
Tryptophan 0.090 g 32 %
Tyrosine 0.183 g
Valine 0.303 g 17 %
Phenylalanine+Tyrosine 0.532 g 30 %
Methionine+Cysteine 0.113 g 11 %
Carbohydrates
Nutrient Amount DV
Carbohydrate 35.18 g 13 %
Fiber 4.56 g 16 %
Starch 29.85 g
Sugars 0.88 g
Fructose 0.08 g
Galactose 0.00 g
Glucose 0.08 g
Lactose 0.00 g
Maltose 0.47 g
Sucrose 0.23 g
Net carbs 30.62 g
Omega-3 Omega-6 Omega-6 / Omega-3 ratio
0.04 g 0.63 g 15.75
Nutrient Amount DV
Fat 2.001 g 3 %
Saturated fatty acids 0.284 g 1 %
Butanoic acid 0.000 g
Decanoic acid 0.000 g
Docosanoic acid 0.004 g
Dodecanoic acid 0.000 g
Eicosanoic acid 0.002 g
Heptadecanoic acid 0.001 g
Hexadecanoic acid 0.242 g
Hexanoic acid 0.000 g
Octadecanoic acid 0.025 g
Octanoic acid 0.000 g
Pentadecanoic acid 0.004 g
Tetracosanoic acid 0.002 g
Tetradecanoic acid 0.005 g
Monounsaturated fatty acids 0.206 g
Cis-hexadecenoic acid 0.002 g
Cis-octadecenoic acid 0.197 g
Docosenoic acid 0.000 g
Docosenoic cis acid 0.000 g
Docosenoic trans acid 0.000 g
Eicosenoic acid 0.007 g
Heptadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Hexadecenoic acid 0.002 g
Octadecenoic acid 0.197 g
Pentadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Tetracosenoic cis acid 0.000 g
Tetradecenoic acid 0.000 g
Trans-hexadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Trans-octadecenoic acid 0.000 g
Polyunsaturated fatty acids 0.672 g
α-linolenic acid n-3 (ALA) 0.04 g
γ-linolenic acid n-6 (GLA) 0.00 g
Cis,cis-eicosadienoic n-6 acid 0.000 g
Linoleic acid n-6 (LA) 0.63 g
Docosahexaenoic n-3 acid (DHA) 0.000 g
Docosapentaenoic n-3 acid (DPA) 0.000 g
Docosatetraenoic acid 0.000 g
Eicosadienoic acid 0.000 g
Eicosadienoic n-3 acid 0.000 g
Eicosadienoic n-6 acid 0.000 g
Eicosapentaenoic n-3 acid (EPA) 0.000 g
Eicosatetraenoic acid 0.000 g
Octadecadienoic CLAs acid 0.000 g
Octadecadienoic acid 0.629 g
Octadecatetraenoic acid 0.000 g
Octadecatrienoic acid 0.042 g
Trans-octadecadienoic acid 0.000 g
Trans-octadecatrienoic acid 0.000 g
Fatty acids, total trans 0.000 g
Fatty acids, total trans-monoenoic 0.000 g
Fatty acids, total trans-polyenoic 0.000 g
Other
Nutrient Amount DV
Alcohol, ethyl 0.0 g
Ash 0.51 g
Caffeine 0.00 mg
Theobromine 0.00 mg
Water 72.31 g

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Pasta, cooked, whole-wheatcontains 174 calories per 117 g serving. This serving contains 2 g of fat, 7 g of protein and 35 g of carbohydrate. The latter is 0.9 g sugar and 4.6 g of dietary fiber, the rest is complex carbohydrate. Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat contains 0.3 g of saturated fat and 0 mg of cholesterol per serving. 117 g of Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat containsIU vitamin A, 0.0 mg of vitamin C and 0.00 mcg of vitamin D as well as 2.01 mg of iron, 15.21 mg of calcium and 112 mg of potassium. Pasta, cooked, whole-wheat belong to ‘Cereal Grains and Pasta’ food category.
Food properties
Source USDA Standard reference
Category Cereal Grains and Pasta

Spaghetti, whole-wheat, cooked Nutrition Facts & Calories

SUMMARY OF THE FOOD Map of Nutritional Targets THE NUTRITIONAL TARGET MAPTMThe Nutritional Target MapTM is a visual representation of how meals align with your nutritional and weight-management objectives. The closer a meal is to the right side of the chart, the greater the amount of critical elements it provides per calorie. Choose items that are located on the right half of the map for a more nutrient-dense diet. In general, the closer a food is to the map’s upper edge, the more likely it is to fill you up while providing less calories.

Foods that are near to the bottom of the list contain a higher concentration of calories.

More information on the Nutritional Target Map may be found here. Typical Nutritional Targets for Spaghetti using whole-wheat pasta, cooked This function necessitates the installation of the Flash player in your browser. You may get the player by clicking here. A rating of 2.43.3Fullness FactorND

The good news is that this dish has very little saturated fat, cholesterol, or sodium. It is also an excellent source of Dietary Fiber, as well as a very good source of the minerals manganese and selenium, among other nutrients. The Caloric Ratio Pyramid is a visual representation of the relationship between calories and fat. CALORIC RATIO PYRAMIDTM is a trademark of CALORIC RATIO PYRAMIDTM. This image tells you what percentage of a food’s calories come from carbohydrate, fat, protein, and alcohol, as well as other nutrients.

  1. Foods that are low in fat, for example, will cluster near the bottom edge of the pyramid, with those that are high in carbs (at the left edge) and foods that are high in protein (at the right edge) forming a continuum between them (at the right edge).
  2. Products with about the same number of calories in fats, calories in carbs, and protein will be located closer to the center of the food pyramid than others.
  3. The Caloric Ratio Pyramid for Whole-Wheat Spaghetti, Cooked is shown below.
  4. You may get the player by clicking here.
  5. It is also an excellent source of Dietary Fiber, as well as a very good source of the minerals manganese and selenium, among other minerals.
  6. Caloric Ratio PyramidTM (also known as CALORIC RATIO PYRAMIDTM) is a mathematical formula that describes the relationship between caloric ratio and the amount of caloric in a certain quantity of time.
  7. You may use the Caloric Ratio PyramidTM to see how recipes, meal plans, and individual items fit into a given calorie distribution, such as the 40/30/30 distribution of the ZoneTM diet or the more standard 60/30/10 distribution.
  8. The top edge will be dominated by foods that are rich in carbs (at the left edge) and the top edge will be dominated by foods that are high in protein (at the right edge).
  9. Products with nearly the same number of calories in fats, calories in carbs, and protein will be found closer to the middle of the food pyramid.

See the Caloric Ratio Pyramid for further information. a calorie-to-fat ratio pyramid for whole-wheat spaghetti cooked in a frying pan Flash player must be installed in your browser in order for this functionality to function. You may get the player by clicking on the link below:

Calorie InformationAmounts Per Selected Serving%DVCarbohydratesAmounts Per Selected Serving%DVFatsFatty AcidsAmounts Per Selected Serving%DV18:2 t not further definedTotal trans-monoenoic fatty acidsTotal trans-polyenoic fatty acidsTotal Omega-3 fatty acidsTotal Omega-6 fatty acids ProteinAmino AcidsAmounts Per Selected Serving%DVVitaminsAmounts Per Selected Serving%DVRetinol Activity EquivalentVitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol)Dietary Folate EquivalentsMineralsAmounts Per Selected Serving%DVSterolsAmounts Per Selected Serving%DVOtherAmounts Per Selected Serving%DV

THE OPINION OF NUTRITION DATA Foods are given a star rating from 0 to 5 stars in each of three categories based on their nutritional density (ND Rating) and satiating impact (Fullness FactorTM) according to Nutrition Data. It is generally agreed that foods that are both healthy and full are the best options for weight loss. Foods that are nutritious but do not fill you up are thought to be superior alternatives for achieving a healthy weight loss. Foods that provide a higher concentration of important nutrients per calorie are regarded to be better alternatives for maintaining optimal health.

More information on Nutrition Data’s point of view may be found here.

Calories in Whole wheat pasta with tuna and corn – Calorie, Fat, Carb, Fiber, and Protein Info

Opinion of NUTRITION DATA In each of three categories, Nutrition Data assigns a star rating ranging from 0 to 5 stars based on the nutritional density (ND Rating) and the satiating impact (Fullness FactorTM) of the items. Nutritional foods that are also full are regarded to be superior choices for weight loss. When it comes to healthy weight growth, foods that are nutritious but not full are regarded to be superior alternatives. When it comes to maintaining optimal health, foods that have higher concentrations of important elements per calorie are preferred.

Check out the whole article for additional information.

Calories 316.5
Total Fat 3.8 g
Saturated Fat 0.6 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.3 g
Monounsaturated Fat 0.5 g
Cholesterol 18.4 mg
Sodium 416.7 mg
Potassium 171.6 mg
Total Carbohydrate 53.1 g
Dietary Fiber 7.0 g
Sugars 3.5 g
Protein 18.4 g
Vitamin A 3.8 %
Vitamin B-12 3.9 %
Vitamin B-6 6.9 %
Vitamin C 5.0 %
Vitamin D 0.0 %
Vitamin E 0.5 %
Calcium 9.7 %
Copper 12.6 %
Folate 6.1 %
Iron 12.8 %
Magnesium 12.6 %
Manganese 99.2 %
Niacin 7.5 %
Pantothenic Acid 8.2 %
Phosphorus 19.5 %
Riboflavin 11.0 %
Selenium 57.4 %
Thiamin 15.6 %
Zinc 9.6 %

In this table, the percent daily values (%DV) are calculated on the basis of a 2,000 calorie diet. Depending on your calorie requirements, your daily values may be greater or fewer than the recommended amounts.

Calories per Ingredient

The following items were selected from our food nutrition database and utilized in the nutrition calculations for this dish. Whole wheat pasta with tuna and corn has a calorie count of 210 per dish. A serving of cooked Whole Wheat Spaghetti (pasta) contains 174 calories (1 cup) Starkist chunk light tuna with water (from a 3 oz can) contains 48 calories (0.69 serving) Del Monte Sweet Corn Cream Style has 35 calories and is available in a variety of flavors (0.25 cup) Flour, white, contains 27 calories (0.06 cup) 1 tablespoon of BrummelBrown, Original Spread prepared with Yogurt, contains 17 calories (0.38 serving) Milk, nonfat contains 11 calories (0.13 cup) Milk, nonfat contains 11 calories (0.13 cup)

How Many Calories in Tesco Whole Wheat Pasta Twists

View the calories and nutritional information for an average (75g) portion of whole wheat pasta twists, as well as how many calories are in 100g of whole wheat pasta twists with nutritional information, so you can see how many calories are in your own serving of nutritious whole grain pasta.

Our sample is from Tesco, but it is representative of the calories in whole wheat pasta. When it comes to healthy eating, Tesco is a fantastic choice. You can discover our 7-day Tesco Diet Planhere.

Tesco Whole Wheat Pasta Twists Calories and Nutrition per Serving (1 Serving=1 Serving/75g)

Calories 242
Protein 9.4
Carbohydrate 46.9
Fat 1.9
Fibre 7.5
Alcohol

Calories (with Percentage) for each Nutrient for 100g of Tesco Whole Wheat Pasta Twists

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Find the Calories in all the Foods You Eat

Find out how many calories and how much nutrients are in all of the meals and beverages you consume in a flash. If you sign up for a free trial with Weight Loss Resources, you will have unrestricted access to the largest food and drink database in the United Kingdom for 24 hours. Additionally, using our online food journal, you can see how many calories you require each day and learn the simple method of counting calories. Taking a free trial takes about 2 minutes and might be the game-changing moment you’ve been waiting for!

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Calorie and Nutrition Values for 100g of Tesco Whole Wheat Pasta Twists

Calories 322
Protein 12.5
Carbohydrate 62.5
Fat 2.5
Fibre 10
Alcohol

Calorie Counting for Weight Loss?

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Deliciously Healthy Recommendations

Editor’s Selections

Calories of Whole Wheat Pasta in Tomato Sauce

213 calories are included in one serving of Whole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce Carbohydrates contribute for 144 calories, proteins for 29 calories, and the remaining calories are derived from fat, which accounts for 40 calories. Approximately 11 percent of the total daily calorie requirement of a regular adult diet of 2,000 calories is provided by one serving of Whole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce per person. See the recipe for Whole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce. Whole wheat pasta, a nutritious Italian delicacy that is also a good source of protein and fiber, should be enjoyed!

Because whole-wheat pasta has been used in place of normal flour pasta, this dish is filled with a delicious tomato sauce and a plethora of vegetables that you will undoubtedly enjoy.

Is Whole Wheat Pasta in Tomato Sauce healthy?

Yes, this is a good thing. Some people, however, are subject to limits. Let’s look at the ingredients one by one. That’s a nice thing. 1.Whole Wheat Pasta: Whole wheat pasta is produced from whole wheat flour, which is ideal for diabetics since it has a low glycemic index (GI) and will not cause your blood sugar levels to spike as quickly as other foods. Whole wheat flour is high in phosphorus, which is a significant mineral that works in conjunction with calcium to help us create our bone structure.

  1. See the specific benefits of whole wheat flour and why it is beneficial to your health.
  2. In conjunction with other phytonutrients found in onions, it aids in the development of WBC (white blood cells), which serve as the first line of defense against sickness.
  3. The antioxidant quercetin helps to increase the generation of HDL (good cholesterol) and reduce total cholesterol levels in the body.
  4. This, in turn, would reduce blood pressure and be beneficial for diabetics and others with heart disease.
  5. 3.Tomatoes: Tomatoes are a particularly good source of the antioxidant Lycopene.
  6. A pregnant woman’s best friend, tomatoes are high inFolate, also known as Folic Acid, which aids in the production and maintenance of new cells in the body, particularly red blood cells.
  7. What exactly is the issue?

The high vitamin B3 content (2.61 mg / cup) has been shown to lower cholesterol levels in the body, hence improving heart health.

The disadvantages.

Take a look at the article.

Cornflour (Cornstarch) is a starch made from corn.

Because of the presence of insoluble fiber in cornflour, it is easy to digest and hence beneficial to the stomach.

Cons.

Those who are on a weight-loss regimen should refrain from reaching for it.

More information may be found by reading on.

Diabetics, heart sufferers, and obese folks are all permitted to consumeWhole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce.

Sweet corn should be avoided in this dish if you are trying to lose weight or improve your heart health.

Is it safe for healthy adults to consume Whole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce?

We would also advise against using sweet corn or reducing the amount of sweet corn used in the dish.

In pregnancy, folic acid is an important vitamin that must be taken in large quantities.

3.Calcium: Calcium is a mineral that helps to keep bones strong and healthy.

4.Vitamin B1: Vitamin B1 protects nerves, aids in glucose metabolism, helps to avoid heart disease, and aids in the production of red blood cells, among other things.

How can I burn the 213 calories in a serving of Whole Wheat Pasta with Tomato Sauce that I consume?

Running at 11 kmph equals 21 minutes. Cycling at 30 kilometers per hour equals 28 minutes. Swimming at 2 kmph equals 37 minutes. Please keep in mind that these are approximate estimates and that calorie burning varies from person to person.

Is Whole-Wheat Pasta Actually Healthier?

If you don’t care for wheat, don’t bother cooking in it anymore. Some individuals believe in whole-wheat pasta with all of their hearts and souls. The size and form of pasta are no longer the only considerations when selecting pasta. With pasta, whether it’s fettuccini, rigatoni, rotini, or plain ol’ macaroni, white versus wheat is the current grocery conundrum (along with making a yodelling supermarket child the CEOvs. permanently banning him from the shop in case he discovers a public address system).

We give you the whole, unadulterated explanation of whether whole wheat is the best option for your diet.

Whole wheat is composed of three distinct portions of the grain:

  • The bran, which serves as the grain’s bomber jacket, protecting it from the elements
  • The germ, which is the grain’s high-top fade, which sprouts from the seed
  • The grain’s high-top fade the endosperm, which is the starchy heart of the grain that is huge and bulky

However, the heat is turned on throughout the refining process. This heat causes the nutrient-dense bran and germ to be forced out of the grain, leaving just the endosperm to remain in the grain. If you prefer whole-wheat rice over pasta, you may skip the rest of this section and go straight to this page for cooking instructions. While white flour has a longer shelf life and is less expensive than whole-grain flour, it does not provide as much nutritious value as its whole-grain counterparts do.

  • Hlebowicz and colleagues (2010).
  • DOI:10.1186/1475-2891-7-12 Learn about different nutrient-dense grains that may be used to fill your face and stomach.
  • As a result, whole wheat receives one point.
  • Maki, K.C., and colleagues (2019).

In spite of the fact that refined grains have a somewhat tarnished reputation when compared to their whole wheat counterparts, a 2019 review on refined grains discovered that eating up to 6 or 7 30-gram servings of refined grains is not likely to increase the risk of heart disease, diabetes, or death in general.

A.

Perspective: Grains that have been refined and their effect on health: Is there a genuine risk, or is there guilt by association?

Whole wheat products, on the other hand, are the undisputed champs when it comes to lowering your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and overall mortality.

McCrae, M., and McCrae, M. (2017). An umbrella review of meta-analyses on the health effects of eating whole grains was conducted. DOI:10.1016/j.jcm.2016.08.008 Choosing whole wheat offers the greatest amount of nutritional advantages, which include:

  • Among the nutrients present in the bran and germ are vitamin E, the key B vitamins, antioxidants, fiber (which may make your stools beautiful and postpone your appetite), protein, and healthy fats.

It is recommended by the Department of Human and Health Services (HHS) that people consume 50 percent whole wheat and proud grains every day of their lives. This translates into three to five servings each day for everyone above the age of nine years. A serving might be anything as simple as a little muffin or piece of bread. A single serving of pasta can be made from half a cup of cooked pasta or one ounce of dried pasta. While whole wheat is normally the best choice for maximum nutritional benefits, processed grains aren’t harmful when consumed in moderation as long as they aren’t overindulged.

Anyone who has a wheat allergy or intolerance, on the other hand, should avoid this sort of product at all costs and should opt for a gluten-free version instead.

However, they are still unable to compete with the inherent benefits of unpolished whole grains in terms of nutrition.

Slavin et al (2000).

DOI:10.1046/j.1440-6047.2000.00171.x Even yet, whole wheat may not be on the menus of most restaurants (and forget about the more traditional Italian eateries, which like refining a grain or two for their patrons).

For the sake of completeness, the jokes in this article have not been refined.) Take a closer look at the nutritional information on those food labels.

Look for the words “100 percent whole wheat” or the orange “Whole Grain” mark on the packaging.

Do not be alarmed.

If they think you’re in for some bran and germs, they’re not shy about letting you know about it.

Following the cooking directions on the packaging will help to ensure that the noodles do not become clumped together while cooking.

The addition of whole-wheat pasta to a recipe may be a simple and delicious way to enjoy a nutritious dinner while sneaking in those important whole grains.

No offense, grain refinement enthusiasts.

Refined grains, on the other hand, are not as bad as some people have made them out to be over the years.

If you are allergic to gluten or wheat, you should also avoid whole wheat products to the greatest extent. It’s simply more of what’s causing your system to malfunction.

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